Course Descriptions

 

Accounting

ACC* 100: Basic Accounting - 3 CREDITS

An introductory course for non-Accounting majors, and owners and managers of small businesses. Covers the basic structure, concepts, and principles of accounting, and correct use of accounting terminology. The practical aspect of accounting is emphasized through recording, classifying, and summarizing the financial information that flows within a business enterprise. The accounting cycle, including statement presentation, is examined along with such areas as sales, purchases, cash, receivables, and payroll. Supplemented with software applications. This course is not open to students who have completed ACC* 115 or higher, with a grade of "C-" or better.

ACC* 108: Payroll Accounting - 3 CREDITS

This course will provide accounting students with an overview of the responsibilities of a payroll specialist and the importance of the payroll operations in a business. It will provide the student with an essential understanding of payroll accounting laws, regulations and methodology. Other topics covered are the need for timely and accurate payroll data as a key part of the management function, tax rules, tax rates and tax reports. In this course, students will have hands-on experience aided by technology that utilizes the latest payroll accounting software. 
Prerequisite: ACC* 100 or ACC* 115.

ACC* 115: Financial Accounting - 4 CREDITS

Designed as an introduction to the accounting theory necessary to understand basic accounting practices; to read, analyze, and interpret financial statements; and to make informed business and financial decisions.

ACC* 118: Managerial Accounting - 4 CREDITS

An introduction to the basic concepts needed to select and use accounting information necessary for managerial decision making. Students learn how managers plan for the operations of their business, assess how effectively their plans are being implemented, control operations, and use accounting data to make internal decisions. 
Prerequisite: ACC* 115 with a grade of "C-" or better.

ACC* 123: Accounting Software Applications - 3 CREDITS

A hands-on course in accounting information management that demonstrates the accounting uses of spreadsheet software. Students learn the major components of spreadsheet software for accounting including macros, graphics, and database manipulation. Students build real-world accounting models in each of the three components utilizing print options, function commands, and file manipulation. Recommended prior to taking ACC* 275. 
Prerequisite: ACC* 100 or ACC* 115 with a grade of "C-" or better.

ACC* 233: Principles of Cost Accounting - 4 CREDITS

Presents the principles involved in determining the cost of manufacturing an article and covers job order cost, process cost, and standard cost accounting. Uses of cost accounting information in the determination of management decisions are studied through cost analysis. Joint costs, by-product costs, the nature of the master budget, direct and absorption costing, and break even analysis are examined. Offered in the fall semester.
Prerequisite: ACC* 118 with a grade of "C-" or better.

ACC* 241: Federal Taxes I - 3 CREDITS

This course is primarily concerned with the federal tax structure and the preparation of individual income tax returns and related schedules. Practice is supplied through problem solving. A class project may be assigned. Offered in the spring semester.

ACC* 275: Principles of Intermediate Accounting I - 4 CREDITS

The primary concern in this course is the application of concepts and principles to financial statement analysis with emphasis on theory, classification, and evaluation of assets and liabilities. Current changes in the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) are studied where applicable. This course is supplemented by the use of spreadsheet software for problem solving. Offered in the fall semester. 
Prerequisite: ACC* 118 and either ACC* 123 or CSA* 135, all with a grade of "C-" or better.

ACC* 276: Principles of Intermediate Accounting II - 4 CREDITS

The study of the theoretical aspects of liability and related expense recognition, shareholders' equity, and financial statement preparation and analysis. Major emphasis is placed on the analytical process, and the use of interpretation of financial data. Spreadsheet and accounting software are sometimes used for problem solving. Offered in the spring semester.
Prerequisite: ACC* 275 with a grade of "C-" or better.

ACC* 294: Internship in Accounting - 3 CREDITS

This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job work experience, to provide a vital link between classroom theories and ideas and the world of work. Assignments may be in private, public, or non-profit organizations in areas such as manufacturing, retailing, personnel, accounting, service or governmental organizations, or finance. This experience will enable students, under supervision, to integrate experience with theoretical knowledge. Each credit earned requires 40 hours of work placement. In addition, six classroom seminar periods are required during the semester, where students will establish learning goals for the work assignment, discuss work-related issues, and career development in their field. Students must complete their work assignment, attend the seminars, and complete their required course papers in order to receive credit for the course. Graded pass/fail.
Prerequisite: Minimum of 21 credits completed in program and permission of instructor.

ACC* 298: Special Topics: Quickbooks - 3 CREDITS

This course will provide the student with a basic understanding of Quickbooks. Students will learn how to enter data, prepare financial statements and create reports.

Anthropology

ANT* 101: Introduction to Anthropology - 3 CREDITS

This survey course is primarily devoted to cultural anthropology, emphasizing the study of culture and social institutions through a comparative examination of non-literate peoples, early civilizations and modern societies. Less emphasized is the study of human evolution and the effects of cultural and biological factors in that evolution.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for prerequisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

ANT* 111: Anthropology of Women - 3 CREDITS

A historical, cross-cultural study of the role of women. The course examines women's social, political, and economic positions in both primitive and industrialized societies, and traces the evolution of the status of women from pre-history to modern times. The mythologies of primitive and ancient peoples are also examined for clues into the nature of the female's role. A grade of C- is the passing grade for prerequisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

Art

ART* 100: Art Appreciation - 3 CREDITS

This course explores the constantly changing world of art, discovering how this form of expression is defined and the varied ways in which it can be appreciated. The study of the individual elements and principles that constitute a work of art is undertaken in this exploration of creativity. Visits to galleries, studios, and museums are an integral part of the course, as are artist videos and websites, class discussions and written assignments.

ART* 101: Art History I - 3 CREDITS

An examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphics from pre-history to the Renaissance. Gaining an understanding of art from these periods and an awareness of its historical significance are emphasized. The study of art is approached through slide lectures, discussions, papers, and gallery/museum visits.

ART* 102: Art History II - 3 CREDITS

An examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphics from the Renaissance to the present. Gaining an understanding of art from these periods and an awareness of its historical significance are emphasized. The study of art is approached through slide lectures, discussions, papers, and gallery/museum visits. ART* 101: Art History I is NOT required for this course.

ART* 111: Drawing I - 3 CREDITS

This studio course covers the basic elements, media and processes of drawing within a hands-on studio context. Composition, value and perspective are addressed. Extensive drawing from still-life, landscapes and reproductions will emphasize development of students’ manual and perceptual skills.

ART* 123: Design I - 3 CREDITS

The theory and practice of design principles within a hands-on studio context. Texture, figure and ground, value, color, perspective, movement, space, motion, and mass will be addressed. An understanding of, and an ability to control, these elements and principles of design will be emphasized.

ART* 131: Sculpture I - 3 CREDITS

A studio course in the principles, techniques, and materials of sculpture. Processes include metal fabrication/welding, casting, plaster, wood, and found objects, among others. Students will concentrate on controlling sculptural media and examining the fundamentals of three-dimensional design.

ART* 141: Photography I - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to black and white film photography, including camera operation, creative controls, composition, film processing, printing and print finishing techniques. Emphasis is on photography as a fine art and as a means of communication. Through demonstrations, assignments, critiques, supervised and independent lab work, students will develop technical skills and explore the creative/expressive side of photography.

ART* 151: Painting I - 3 CREDITS

A studio course in the technical and aesthetic fundamentals of painting, covering the selection and use of materials, basic color theory, and realistic and expressive paint handling. Students will work in both traditional and experimental painting styles.

ART* 167: Printmaking I - 3 CREDITS

This studio course covers all phases of the printing process from the preparation of the screen, block, or plate to the printing of an edition of works. The three basic approaches to printing: relief (raised surface), intaglio (recessed surface), and lithography (flat surface) are utilized in the creation of individual works of art.

ART* 215: Illustration - 3 CREDITS

This course will explore in a more complex manner the objects, principles, and media as presented in ART* 111: Drawing I. Greater emphasis will be placed upon the development of personal drawing styles and the expression of individual feelings towards a variety of subjects and themes.
Prerequisite: ART* 111

Astronomy

AST* 101: Principles of Astronomy - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to descriptive astronomy. Topics include understanding the earth and its motions; the moon; instrumentation used in astronomy; and the origin of the universe. Emphasis is on visual observation of celestial phenomena. Recent advances in astronomy are discussed. 
Prerequisite: One year of high school mathematics.

Biology

BIO* 111: Introduction to Nutrition - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the basic principles of nutrition with emphasis on the biological basis of human nutrition, nutrient metabolism and interaction. Topics include the structure and function of the carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins and minerals; the role these nutrients play in energy balance needs; human health; and degenerative diseases.

BIO* 115: Human Biology - 4 CREDITS

This introductory course offers an overview of the human body and its processes emphasizing health and how the body maintains homeostasis in a changing environment. This course will cover cell biology,histology and the major systems of the body, including skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, nervous and digestive. 3 hours lecture/3 hours lab. This course does NOT satisfy the prerequisite for BIO* 211: Anatomy & Physiology I and BIO* 235: Microbiology.

BIO* 121: General Biology I - 4 CREDITS

This course investigates the concepts of scientific methodology and the studies of representative plant and animal cells. Topics include the study of molecular and plant biology; cell division; the basic principles of genetics; and the role of DNA and RNA in human inheritance. (BIO* 121 or BIO* 122 may be taken in either semester. BIO*121 with a grade of C will satisfy the prerequisite for BIO* 211 Anatomy & Physiology I and BIO* 235 Microbiology. 3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.)

BIO* 122: General Biology II - 4 CREDITS

This course investigates the concept of taxonomy and the diversity of life forms. Topics include the comparative study of representative microorganisms; the anatomy and physiology of animal systems, with special emphasis on the human body; and the ecological and evolutionary relationship between plants, animals and their environment. (BIO* 121 or BIO* 122 may be taken in either semester. 3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.)

BIO* 170: Principles of Ecology - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the basic principles of ecology which demonstrate the interdependence between living and non-living factors in nature. Topics include the growth and structure of natural and human populations, food chains, biogeochemical cycles and the interrelationship between animal populations, including a discussion of humans' effect on them.

BIO* 180: Principles of Environmental Science - 3 CREDITS

This is a survey course of Environmental Science.  Topics include basic ecology, biodiversity, human populations, water, soil, forests and pollution, renewable and non-renewable energy, and legislation.
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101

BIO* 211: Anatomy and Physiology I - 4 CREDITS

A comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body and the integration of body systems. Includes study of macroscopic and microscopic anatomy and the principles involved in the physiology of the following body systems: integumentary, lymph, muscular, skeletal, articular, and nervous. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab).
Prerequisite: C or better in BIO* 121.

BIO* 212: Anatomy and Physiology II - 4 CREDITS

A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. A detailed study of the structure and function of the following body systems: endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab). 
Prerequisite: C or better in BIO* 211.

BIO* 235: Microbiology - 4 CREDITS

This course is a basic study of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacteria. It investigates host-parasite relationships, epidemiology, immunology, microscopy, microbial metabolism and growth, pathogenicity, microbial genetics, and microbial control. It also includes a survey of the microbiology of the major infectious diseases. 
Prerequisite: C or better in BIO* 121.

BIO* 260: Principles of Genetics - 3 CREDITS

An introductory course in genetics. This course covers the basic principles of genetics from Mendel to recombinant DNA, with emphasis on human inheritance. Topics include an examination of the role genetics plays in cancer, aging, and behavior along with the concepts of eugenics (selective breeding), genetic diseases, and genetic engineering.

Business

BBG* 101: Introduction to Business - 3 CREDITS

Provides a basic overview of the structure of business organizations, large and small. Reviews distinguishing features of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Covers all aspects of organizing a business. An excellent course for someone wishing an overview of business, or for the person who has not worked extensively in a business and wishes to get some solid background. Highly recommended for all people without significant business experience.

BBG* 117: Introduction to Quickbooks - 1 CREDITS

This course is an introduction to the business software known as QuickBooks, one of the more popular softwares in use for small businesses that may also be used to keep personal records. The course will be taught using a "hands-on" approach to help students learn the software's features. This course takes a user perspective by illustrating how accounting information is both created and used. The student will learn to investigate the underlying source documents that generate most financial statements. The course focus will be on generating financial statements. (See also ACC* 121.)

BBG* 125: The Future and Organizations - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the study of the future from an organizational perspective. Emphasis is on examination of the effect population has on the future; learning different methods of futures forecasting; development of future-oriented thinking; environmental scanning techniques; and networks to increase our capabilities to address and adapt to change. (See also HUM* 141.)

BBG* 210: Business Communications - 3 CREDITS

This course introduces the fundamentals of communication for personal, business and professional use. Students will practice how to write letters, memos and reports, prepare graphics, and deliver oral presentations according to current writing styles and business conventions. Instruction will include reinforcement of English/grammar skills, team and small group communication, oral presentations, nonverbal communications, resume preparation and interviewing skills. (See also BOT* 201.)
Prerequisite: ENG* 043 or ENG* 073

BBG* 215: Global Business - 3 CREDITS

An introduction course designed to provide students with the foundations for conducting international business and an understanding of the impact of the social, cultural, economic, political, religious, and legal environments in international trade. The course will focus on the importance of globalization, foreign investment, international marketing, international management, and operations of multinational corporations.
Prerequisite: BMG* 202

BBG* 232: Business Law II - 3 CREDITS

A continuation of the course, Business Law I. Special emphasis is given to the Uniform Commercial Code, partnerships, corporations, real property, and commercial paper.
Prerequisite: BBG* 231

BBG* 234: Legal Environment of Business - 3 CREDITS

The meaning of law and structure of the American legal system are studied with a view toward the impact of law upon the operation of American business. Ethics and social responsibility are examined through the lens of stakeholder analysis and other analytical tools. Students will explore ethical issues, and their own ethics as major components of the course. Major aspects of government regulation of business such as products liability, securities regulation, worker protection, and intellectual property issues are also explored. The course also examines fiduciary duty and tort liability. May not be taken by students who have completed either Business Law I or Business Law II.

BBG* 240: Business Ethics - 3 CREDITS

This course is an introduction to Business Ethics. Students will explore the philosophical underpinnings of ethics, which will then be applied to the modern corporate environment. The macro and micro environment that impacts decision making, the context of the ever-increasing pressure for public and private corporations to increase profitability, and the social, moral and legal implications will be examined. The case method will be used to study actual corporate cases, as well as hypothetical cases designed to examine the philosophical, moral, sociological, and legal issues. 
Prerequisite: BMG* 101 or BMG* 202 or permission of instructor

BBG* 294: Business Internship - 3 CREDITS

Field work experience in business and accounting. Assignments may be in private, public, or non-profit organizations in areas such as manufacturing, retailing, personnel, accounting or finance. This experience will enable students, under supervision, to integrate experience with theoretical knowledge. Each credit earned requires 40 hours of work placement. In addition, six one-hour classroom seminar periods will be required during the semester.  Graded pass/fail.
Prerequisite: Minimum of 21 credit hours completed in program core and permission of instructor.

BES* 118: Small Business Management - 3 CREDITS

A basic course studying the problems involved in starting, managing, and operating a small business. Provides an overall approach to small business. Emphasis is on evaluating the problems, risks, and rewards of operating a small firm. Not regularly offered.

BES* 218: Entrepreneurship - 3 CREDITS

This is a basic course designed to help people identify the challenges and opportunities that people face who wish to create their own organizations. While the course will be aimed at starting a business, most of the concepts are easily transferable to the not-for-profit sector. Students with interests in either area are invited. In the 21st century, information technology, the widespread dispersion of talent across the world, and the speed of transportation all have combined to create an entrepreneurial opportunity that is unparalleled. It is now possible to create a new business that serves a particular market need dispersed throughout the world. No longer do small businesses have to 'act small.' Web sites, email, and package delivery speed all mean that small businesses can compete with large ones as never before, even in the manufacturing arena. This course is about learning how to think like an entrepreneur, act like an entrepreneur, and how to be successful as an entrepreneur - creating an organization that works.

BFN* 201: Principles of Finance - 3 CREDITS

The basic principles of finance, the functions and relationships of financial institutions, and operational procedures of the money markets, including sources of financing and management of financial assets. Applications of finance to the business firm, community, and family are investigated in light of the current economy.
Prerequisite: BMG* 101 or BMG* 202, MAT* 121, or equivalent (Accounting I recommended).

BMG* 202: Principles of Management - 3 CREDITS

A beginning course in management emphasizing the development of problem identification, analysis, and problem-solving skills. Concentrates on the human side of management through coverage of such topics as motivation, planning, leadership, team development, decision making, communications, and organizing. Case studies are a major part of the course. Offered every semester. This course is not open to students who have completed BMG* 101: Introduction to Management.

BMG* 210: Organizational Behavior - 3 CREDITS

The study of people and groups in organizations. Includes the study of team effectiveness, learning styles, communications, motivation, conflict, the evaluation of behavior. Extensive student participation. Orientation is toward development of personal effectiveness in dealing with others.
Prerequisite: BMG* 101 or BMG* 202

BMG* 220: Human Resource Management - 3 CREDITS

Mismanagement of human resources costs organizations millions of dollars yearly. This course emphasizes positive ways to select, train, motivate, and evaluate today's workers to provide maximum effectiveness. Organizational behavior findings provide the basis for the topics covered in the course. 
Prerequisite: BMG* 101 or BMG* 202

BMG* 220: Human Resouces Management - 3 CREDITS

Mismanagement of human resources costs organizations millions of dollars yearly. This course emphasizes positive ways to select, train, motivate, and evaluate today's workers to provide maximum effectiveness. Organizational behavior findings provide the basis for the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisite: BMG* 101 or BMG* 202.

BMK* 201: Principles of Marketing - 3 CREDITS

This course covers marketing methods and institutions, including analysis and interrelationship of the marketing mix. Application of basic management and marketing strategy planning methods, and performance computations related to marketing efficiency are also covered. This course is not open to students who have completed BMK* 101: Introduction to Marketing.
Prerequisite: Placement in ENG* 101 or permission of instructor

BMK* 207: Consumer Behavior - 3 CREDITS

This course builds a useful conceptual framework that both enhances understanding and permits practical application of consumer behavior principles to marketing strategy. Discussion focuses on the consumer as an individual, consumers in their social and cultural settings, the consumer decision-making process, and consumer behavior and society.
Prerequisite: BMK* 101 or BMK* 201

BMK* 208: Social Media Marketing - 3 CREDITS

Facebook, blogs, YouTube, Twitter, and other new technologies have changed and challenged the marketing landscape. By analyzing case studies and examining current uses of social media marketing, students will learn how to harness the power of user-generated content to create buzz, position products, and raise brand awareness. The course will emphasize strategies for measuring the effectiveness of social media marketing campaigns. (See also COM* 200)

BMK* 221: Sales Management - 3 CREDITS

Studies the persuasive techniques used in personal selling. Discussion focuses on the steps in the sales process, the management of that process, and the role of sales within the Promotion element of the marketing mix.
Prerequisite: BMK* 101 or BMK* 201

BMK* 230: Advertising & Promotion - 3 CREDITS

Concentrates on the communication aspects of marketing. Discussion focuses on the Promotion element of the marketing mix and its sub-elements of advertising, sales, public relations, and sales promotion. The importance of promotion in the strategic marketing planning process is analyzed.
Prerequisite: BMK* 101 or BMK* 201

Chemistry

CHE* 111: Concepts of Chemistry - 4 CREDITS

A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted. A one-semester course for non-majors covering atomic structure and chemical bonding, followed by discussion of air, water, foods, drugs, plastics, and agricultural chemicals. Not a prerequisite for other chemistry courses, not a substitute for Chemistry 121-122. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.)
Prerequisite: MAT* 095

CHE* 121: General Chemistry I - 4 CREDITS

A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted. The first semester is a study of the principles of chemistry, including basic concepts, atomic structure, energy, relationships, periodicity, bonding, gases, liquids, and solids. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.)   
Prerequisite: MAT* 137 (may be taken concurrently)

CHE* 122: General Chemistry II - 4 CREDITS

A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted. This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics included are thermodynamics, reaction rates, equilibria, electrochemistry, and an introduction to organic and biochemistry. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.) 
Prerequisite: CHE* 121

Communications

COM* 101: Introduction to Mass Communication - 3 CREDITS

Course is intended to foster the intelligent appraisal of print media, radio, film, television, and new media, and to track their historical development, structures, roles, and functions in our society and others throughout the world. The media are analyzed in terms of their manipulative powers and role in the development of our environment. Materials reviewed include newspaper reports, press releases, newscasts, advertising copy, films, television broadcasts, social media, and new media. Communications majors may explore specific areas of concern for employment and/or college transfer.
Prerequisite: Placement in ENG* 101

COM* 121: Journalism I - 3 CREDITS

The primary aim of the class is to teach the basics of print journalism. Toward that end, students will engage in a series of exercises and assignments as they learn how to report news. Additional areas of exploration may include newspaper history, investigative work, and feature and sports reporting. Internships with the college newspaper or newspapers in nearby towns are possibilities. We will also attempt to acquaint those interested in journalism as a career choice with workplace environment.

COM* 122: Sports Reporting - 3 CREDITS

Sports Reporting--Introduces students to the fundamentals of sports writing. Students will analyze sports reporting in print, broadcast, and online. Assignments emphasize practical skills grounded in journalism, including interviewing, writing, and editing. Students will produce both written and recorded (audio/video) assignments to demonstrate course competencies.
Prerequisite: Placement in ENG* 101

COM* 131: Audio Production - 3 CREDITS

Introductory class designed to familiarize students with the basics of audio production and performance. Technical aspects of the class focus on the equipment, studio environment, and recording, mixing, and editing techniques used in radio production. Students will learn performance basics and practice these techniques while producing PSAs, promos, and commercials. While the class focuses primarily on radio production and performance, many of the skills developed over the course of the semester can be transferred to other applications, such as video and multi-media production. 

COM* 166: Video Filmmaking - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to basic video production concepts, ideas, and techniques. A hands-on course--students actively participate in video field production. Students work on their projects individually and/or in small groups as required. Class covers instruction in the use of all college video production equipment, including cameras, VTRs, switchers, editors, and post-production equipment; an analytical survey of production styles and formats, such as ENG and EFP production, documentary, performance (music, theater, film), training, advertising and sports; and fundamental instructional design, production outlining, scriptwriting, narrative structures, and post-production techniques. By the course's end, each student should be able to produce one finished program of about ten minutes in length using a variety of production techniques. 

COM* 173: Public Speaking - 3 CREDITS

Objective is to develop student capabilities in oral communication before an audience. Focuses on observation, analysis, and practice in various types of public speaking. Special attention is given to the organization of ideas, proper English language usage, platform presence, control of voice, and confidence building. Students may also participate in group activities including debates, panel discussions and forums, and general reporting. 

COM* 191: Radio Practicum - 1 CREDITS

Students enrolled in the practicum gain hands-on experience at WACC, Asnuntuck's radio station. Each student is assigned a weekly, three-hour air shift. Students will learn how to operate station equipment, follow a format clock, and adhere to FCC rules and regulations as well as WACC policies. This class is graded on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated for up to three credits.
Prerequisite: COM* 131 with a grade of C- or better, and permission of the Communications Program Coordinator

COM* 200: Social Media Marketing - 3 CREDITS

Facebook, blogs, YouTube, Twitter, and other new technologies have changed and challenged the marketing landscape. By analyzing case studies and examining current uses of social media marketing, students will learn how to harness the power of user-generated content to create buzz, position products, and raise brand awareness. The course will emphasize strategies for measuring the effectiveness of social media marketing campaigns. (See also BMK* 208)

COM* 232: Advanced Audio Production - 3 CREDITS

The course introduces students to advanced digital production techniques for radio, video, and multimedia. Through lectures, demonstrations, and production assignments, students gain valuable knowledge of the theory and practices of audio art as a recognized form of artistic expression using advanced techniques of audio manipulation on digital audio workstations. Topics include digitizing, formats, synthesis, filtering, and effects via digital techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on audio for radio and video. The course provides students with intensive practice and skill development in audio production techniques, while preparing them to work directly with video and radio program producers. 
Prerequisite: COM* 131

COM* 241: Television Production - 3 CREDITS

Designed to familiarize students with video production concepts, ideas, and techniques beyond the elementary understanding of the process.  This is a hands-on course; each student or team produces a variety of finished programs.  The focus is on live studio production, with limited post-production.  Students work in teams.  Includes review of instruction in the use of all college video production equipment, including cameras, and recording, switching, editing and post-production equipment; instructional design, production outlining, scriptwriting, narrative structures and news, and post-production techniques; introduction to Video Toaster and graphic design; and extensive experience producing studio-based programs.  Intended for students having a working knowledge of TV equipment.  

COM* 295: Internship I - 3 CREDITS

Supervised experience working in a professional communications environment. The internship is a program designed to provide the student with hands-on, practical experience in the information or communications professions. In collaboration with the program coordinator, the student will design a program of study and work to identify an appropriate placement (e.g. radio or television station, newspaper, web design company, photography studio, art design firm, etc.). Students will serve their internship under the supervision of a full-time faculty member, adjunct instructor, and/or a practicing member of the profession. Evaluation of the internship experience is shared between the Communications and Broadcasting Program Coordinator and on-site supervisor. Prerequisite: Approval of Communications and Broadcasting Program Coordinator. 

COM* 296: Internship II - 3 CREDITS

Internship II may either be a continuation of an Internship I placement, or may be a new placement for students who have completed Internship I. Internship II is designed to give students practical, hands-on experience in a professional communications workplace. Students submit a report at the end of the semester to reflect on the internship experience. Course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COM*295 and approval of Communications Program Coordinator

Info. Systems Technology

CSA* 105: Introduction of Software Applications - 3 CREDITS

This course teaches the use of computers as an office productivity tool rather than how computers work. It offers instruction and practice on the use of personal computers and a variety of application software. Emphasis in this course is on developing practical applications for business and personal productivity. Currently, the Microsoft Office software products Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access are being taught. This course also covers file-management using the Microsoft Windows operating system, computer science topics, and other skills, to the extent that they support the applications approach. This course is available online and on ground. Basic computer touch-typing skills required. 

CSA* 125: Exploring Word Processing and Desktop Publishing - 4 CREDITS

This course is designed to prepare students for the contemporary business environment in which they are expected to complete a variety of projects using computer hardware technology and application software. The complexity of an office project often dictates the software to use. This course introduces the concepts of word processing and includes an overview of desktop publishing. Students will learn to create and format a document, organize the content and customize the office software to facilitate communication. Applications include preparing personal documents (arranging paragraphs, manipulating text, tables, formatting graphics including tables, graphs and charts), letterhead, business cards, newsletters, brochures, specialty promotional documents, charts, presentation materials, reports, flyers, and booklets. (This course is intended for the business office professional and not the graphic artist.)
Prerequisite: Strong Windows skills and touch typing skills

CSA* 135: Spreadsheet Applications - 3 CREDITS

The principles and concepts for using a spreadsheet package. The course investigates skills and concepts using spreadsheet software in an innovative manner. A comprehensive knowledge of the spreadsheet is important to the understanding of many other courses.
Prerequisite: Proficiency in Windows

CSA* 145: Database Management - 3 CREDITS

This introductory course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts and in-depth principles associated with designing, managing and administering a database system. Topics include: creating queries to obtain information from the data in their databases, data maintenance, publishing data access pages to the Internet, creating custom forms and reports, creating mailing labels, creating an application menu system, and integrating a spreadsheet into a database.
Prerequisite: Proficiency in Windows

CSA* 294: Internship in Computer and Information Systems - 3 CREDITS

This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job work experience, to provide a vital link between classroom theories and ideas and the world of work. Assignments may be in private, public, or non-profit organizations in areas such as manufacturing, retailing, personnel, accounting, service or governmental organizations, or finance. This experience will enable students, under supervision, to integrate experience with theoretical knowledge. Each credit earned requires 40 hours of work placement. In addition, six classroom seminar periods are required during the semester, where students will establish learning goals for the work assignment, discuss work-related issues, and career development in their field. Students must complete their work assignment, attend the seminars, and complete their required course papers in order to receive credit for the course.
Prerequisite: Minimum of 21 credits completed in program and permission of instructor. Graded pass/fail.

CSA* 298: Special Topics: Introduction to Apple Applications - 3 CREDITS

Computers are essential tools in almost all kinds of activity in virtually every type of business. In today's competitive job market and technology-filled world, students should effectively be proficient in both PCs and Macs to support all aspects of business functions. By overcoming some of the basic operational differences between Macs and PCs, in this lab setting, PC users will feel confident about encountering Macintoshes in their professional and personal lives. This hands-on course introduces students to the key features and basic functions of the Apple computer, its operating system and various applications available. Specifically, students will be introduced to, iLife, iWork and Office 2011 through hands on projects from creating an integrated professional presentation and video to evaluating and experimenting with mobile applications that support a business.

CSC* 101: Introduction to Computers - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed for the individual who wants to become computer literate and learn how to effectively use the Windows based microcomputer as a tool at home, school or on the job. General hardware and software concepts are covered. The student will be exposed to operating system concepts and application software through lecture and hands-on activities. Email communication skills will be developed, and the use of the Internet as a communication and research tool. This course is not acceptable as fulfilling the computer requirement in Business, Computer & Information Systems, and Business Office Technology degree and certificate programs.

CSC* 106: Structured Programming - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the art and science of programming a computer. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and the translation of solutions into a programming language. Topics include objected-oriented program design with event driven programming techniques, graphical user interface design, data types, input/output control structures, loop structures, and program modularity. It also includes an introduction to the array and file data structures. (The current language is Visual Basic).

CSC* 205: Visual Basic I - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the principles and fundamental concepts of the programming language, Visual Basic, a relatively new language included in a category of computer programming languages known as object-oriented, event-driven, Windows-oriented. Provides a vital foundation for those students intending career growth in computer programming and especially those students interested in Windows applications. 
Prerequisite: CSC* 106 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or permission of instructor.

CSC* 218: Programming - 4 CREDITS

The C# programming language is the next phase in the evolution of C and C++. It is a part of Microsoft Visual Studio.NET programming environment. This course describes how to use C# as a general-purpose programming language as well as how to develop a variety of applications. Topics include object-oriented programming design techniques and programming practices, multithreading and introduction to ASP.NET. 
Prerequisite: CSC* 106 or permission of instructor

CSC* 220: Object Oriented Programming Using Java - 3 CREDITS

This course moves from simple material covering the basics of programming and object-oriented software to relatively advanced material on graphical user interfaces and applets. Topics include programming structures, methods, objects, classes, inheritance, AWT, applets, exception handling, multithreading, I/O, and databases.
Prerequisite: CSC* 106

CSC* 231: Database Design I - 3 CREDITS

This course will teach students the fundamentals of enterprise level database systems. Topics covered include relational database design, table and other objects creation, SQL programming, stored procedures, and data integration. More advanced topics may include interfacing the database with other programming languages, security, error handling, data access object modeling and reporting. Students will also learn to use the database management tools for managing database objects.

CST* 150: Web Design and Development I - 3 CREDITS

This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of designing a web site for the Internet. Students will study the underlying structure of a web page. Students will learn the basics of HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) to create a home page that incorporates text and graphics. This course covers additional features including Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), working with image maps, and a short introduction to Javascript. Each student will design a home page as a course requirement. The present and future advancements of the Internet will be discussed. There are one and a half hours of classroom instruction and one and a half hours of laboratory.
Prerequisite: Proficiency in Windows

CST* 201: Introduction to Management Information Systems - 3 CREDITS

This course provides the background necessary for understanding the role of information systems in organizations and combines business management skills with modern computer technologies required for business operations.  Topics include organizational and technical foundations of information systems, theory of design of information for business operations, database, and network systems, e-commerce and supply chain systems, and information network security management.

CST* 215: Soft Skills for a Digital Workplace - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to help students develop the "people skills" essential in a professional working environment. Proper etiquette and protocol skills are a key ingredient for creating and presenting yourself professionally. Understanding the skills required will better prepare a student for a role in the workplace or community. Students will explore topics including project and process flow, human relations, professional presence, team building, ethics, interpersonal skills, information security, and office systems. Individual and group activities utilizing case study approaches with emphasis on scenarios, backgrounds, approaches, concepts and resolutions will allow the student to understand how to manage interpersonal relationships while providing direct support in the IT field. Understanding key tasks, objectives, time management, assignment of responsibilities, tracking progress and obtaining updates in a timely professional manner are closely examined.
Prerequisite: Any 1 course in CSA*, CSC*, CST* or permission of instructor

CST* 250: Web Design and Development II - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed for students who have a solid background in HTML and CSS and who want to learn to create dynamic websites using advanced design concepts and client-side programming technologies such as Javascript, advanced CSS, and DHTML. Students will explore: the development life cycle, user interoperability, and web site management standards to create professional and appealing websites. Students will gain an understanding of what is involved in building and maintaining interactive, commercial websites on various browser platforms. The specific software used in this course may change from semester to semester based on industry demand. 
Prerequisite: Co-requisite: CST* 150 or permission of instructor

CST* 258: Fundamentals of Internet Programming - 4 CREDITS

A comprehensive introduction to the programming languages and techniques used to create dynamic web sites using client-side and server-side programming. Topics included but not limited to include client-side programming technologies such as JavaScript and Dynamic HTML as well as server-side programming technologies using PHP. Web database technologies will also be covered using the MySQL database. Course content is continually updated to reflect the current state of the art in Internet computing. The course requires substantial hands-on use of computers in a computerized classroom environment. 
Prerequisite: CST* 150: Web Design and Development I

CST* 298: Business Analysis and Data Modeling - 3 CREDITS

Analyzing the data requirements for organizations is critical for business managers, product owners, and subject matter experts. Once requirements are understood the proper design of data structures need to take place to plan the storage of business information for transactional and analytical processing. This course will teach the concepts, principles, issues and techniques for gathering business requirements and designing functional relational databases for managing business data. Sample topics include: business analysis and requirements gathering techniques, entity relationship diagrams, data modeling, business data integrity constraints and an introduction to SQL.

Criminal Justice

CJS* 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice - 3 CREDITS

An overview of the criminal justice system, surveying the basics of law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. Students will develop a working knowledge of the language of the criminal justice system and discuss problems and improvements of the system. 

CJS* 102: Introduction to Corrections - 3 CREDITS

An overview of the historical development of corrections in the U.S. and the present-day workings of the system. Students will consider the integral position of corrections in the criminal justice system and explore the dynamics of corrections in relationship to changing socioeconomic, political, and cultural conditions.  

CJS* 120: Police and the Community - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the study, analysis and recommendations for reducing the severity of the major tension points between police and the community. The course presents an overview of the various aspects of the philosophy of policing known as Community Policing, which involves partnership among the police, the community and other government agencies as a method of responding to citizen demand for service. Students are taught the evolution of policing ranging from the political to the professional era.  

CJS* 126: Gangs and "Families" - 1 CREDITS

This course will provide the student with an overview of the psychology and sociology behind various gangs around the country. In-depth coverage will be given to local gangs' symbolism including their graffiti, styles, tattoos, patches and other markings. Additionally, this course will cover assorted proactive strategies for the police and community in their attempt to control gang violence/crime.  

CJS* 137: Test Preparation for Police Candidates - 1 CREDITS

This course will prepare the students for the application and testing phases of the hiring process in law enforcement, as well as other related criminal justice fields. Students will receive instruction on how to develop contacts for job-related internships. In addition, students will learn about employer expectations and requirements when they are applying for entry-level law enforcement or corrections careers.  

CJS* 201: Criminology - 3 CREDITS

Students in this course develop an understanding of the crime by reading and discussing the leading theories related to the phenomenon of criminal behavior. Students will examine the influence of criminological theory on public policy and the administration of justice in the United States. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to apply the various theories in an explanation of the occurrence, prevention and reaction to crime in society. (See also SOC* 240.)
Prerequisite: CJS* 101

CJS* 202: Juvenile Delinquency - 3 CREDITS

The multifaceted concept of juvenile delinquency. Explores the relationship between social attitudes and definitions of youthful law violations. Examines some of the popular causal factors of juvenile delinquency. (See also SOC* 241.)
Prerequisite: CJS* 101

CJS* 210: Constitutional Law - 3 CREDITS

Introduction to individual rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court, the Bill of Rights and their application to individual states, the significance of constitutional law, and how judges' interpretation of the Constitution transforms society. (See also POL* 212.)  
Prerequisite: CJS* 101

CJS* 211: Criminal Law I - 3 CREDITS

This course is an exploration of the purposes of criminal law, the problems of crime in a free society, elements of a crime, criminal liability and responsibility, defenses available to the criminal defendant, and punishments for criminal acts. The substance of the eight Part I UCR crimes are discussed in detail.
Prerequisite: CJS* 101, and placement in ENG* 101

CJS* 213: Evidence & Criminal Procedure - 3 CREDITS

This course provides an in-depth study of criminal procedure and due process as they are applied to policing and correctional management. Students will study diverse topics of concern to criminal justice professionals such as search and seizure rules, rights of the accused before and during the trial process, and the rights of prisoners. This course will emphasize problem solving skills, through an understanding of case and civil law.
Prerequisite: CJS* 101

CJS* 220: Criminal Investigation - 3 CREDITS

This course will introduce the student to the science of criminal investigation. Students will learn about searching the crime scene, interviewing witnesses, interrogating suspects, methods of surveillance and the special techniques employed in particular kinds of criminal investigations.  

CJS* 244: Community Based Corrections - 3 CREDITS

Students who take this course receive in-depth instruction in the areas of probation, parole, pre- and post-incarceration offender supervision, and alternatives to traditional incarceration. Students will become familiar with the role of jails, local court systems, and the community diversion programs as important elements in the correction process. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify the foundational principles of community oriented corrections, identify nationally recognized examples of successful local offender treatment, and understand the methods for evaluating the success of offender supervision.  

CJS* 290: Practicum in Criminal Justice - 3 CREDITS

Provides students with hands-on experience in the daily functions of a publicly funded or nonprofit organization that operates within some parameter of the criminal justice system. Provides students with an opportunity to translate classroom theory into practical applications. Prerequisite: Written permission of Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. Graded pass/fail.  

Dance

DAN* 121: Dance I - 3 CREDITS

This course is an exploration of the basic techniques, styles, concepts, and composition of dance and movement. No previous training is required or assumed. The course introduces and explores dance movements in the 20th Century through historical analysis and movement. Students will participate in numerous dance exercises during the class. All DAN* courses satisfy the Fine Arts requirement

DAN* 122: Dance II - 3 CREDITS

Dance II will serve as an introduction to the anatomical principles, foundations and fundamentals of dance. The class will stress body alignment, flexibility, coordination, and rhythmic awareness. Emphasis will be on movement analysis and developing a dance vocabulary through technical exercises and dance phrases. This course will facilitate a greater appreciation of dance as a performing art as well as a means of personal expression. All DAN* courses satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: DAN* 121 or permission of instructor

Digital Arts

DGA* 111: Introduction to Computer Graphics - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to creating images using the computer. Students will learn basic imaging skills through the use of industry standard Adobe software programs (Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign). Assignments will stress specific criteria related to the software programs and incorporate design objectives that will enhance the understanding of the programs. Students will produce original art work on the computer. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  

DGA* 128: Digital Photography - 3 CREDITS

A hands-on studio based introduction to digital photography as a fine art and a means of communication. Topics include camera handling and creative controls, image editing and manipulation using Adobe Photoshop, and photographic history and theory. Through lectures, readings, slide presentations, videos and assignments, students will be introduced to the basic vocabulary, concepts, tools and expressive possibilities of digital photography. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  

DGA* 211: Computer Graphics II - 3 CREDITS

This course offers a continuation on an advanced level of many of the skills developed in DGA* 111: Introduction to Computer Graphics. The course progresses from material covered in Computer Graphics through advanced computer methods using current design and imaging software. Instruction will include start-to-finish procedures for multi-paged, multi-colored design applications.
Prerequisite: DGA* 111

Early Childhood Education

ECE* 101: Introduction to Early Childhood Education - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to acquaint students with the field of early childhood education. The importance of the years from birth to five years of age and the part that preschool education can play in a child's development are emphasized. The course acquaints students with historical perspectives of early childhood education along with modern trends and developments. This course requires 10 hours of observation at an approved site.  

ECE* 103: Creative Experiences/Children - 3 CREDITS

Students explore a wide variety of creative media suitable for use with young children. This includes experimentation with and the use of various media, techniques and methods. Emphasis is given to creative experiences as they impact on the development of young children.  

ECE* 109: Science & Math for Children - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to familiarize students with math and science activities and materials appropriate for young children. Students explore the environment as a vehicle to understand science as both a body of knowledge and also a way of learning through daily events and objects that relate to the fields of mathematics and science.
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 141: Infant/Toddler Growth and Development - 3 CREDITS

This course is developed specifically for those who are already providing care for infants and toddlers in daycare or home settings or plan to work with this age group in the future. The course emphasizes developmentally appropriate caregiving by focusing on the emotional, social, cognitive and physical development of infants and toddlers. Other areas covered include nutrition and its impact on infant and toddler development, information and techniques necessary for long-term planning, routines, safety, first aid and the effective use and management of physical space. This course is also appropriate for those involved in the training and supervising of infant and toddler caregivers. Student observations of infant/toddler care are required.  

ECE* 176: Health, Safety & Nutrition - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to help students understand the correlation between health, safety, and nutrition and to explore ways in which children can become involved and responsible for their own well-being. Emphasis will be placed on adults assisting young children to develop good habits and attitudes regarding health, safety, and nutrition. Course content will also focus on the concept of preventive health care. Students will have an opportunity to obtain the Infant/Child CPR Certificate.  

ECE* 180: CDA Credential Preparation - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed for child care providers who wish to obtain a Child Development Associate Credential (CDA) through the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition under the direct assessment system. Students examine and review the CDA competencies and functional areas and their integration with early childhood education theory and practice. Most of the course work assists students in the development of their professional resource file and the completion of other necessary preparation and documentation needed to obtain the credential.
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 182: Child Development - 3 CREDITS

This course is concerned with human development from prenatal through elementary education with particular emphasis on the preschool child. The physical, socio-emotional, and cognitive benchmarks through successive stages of development will be studied in depth. This course requires ten hours of observation (in an NAEYC. accredited program or an instructor-approved program) in order to complete the course.  

ECE* 206: Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the multi-dimensional role of the early childhood program director/administrator. Topics covered are: the responsibilities and skills involved in management, supervision and leadership of preschool programs. Emphasis is placed on the duties and responsibilities of an administrator; the recruitment, orientation, supervision and evaluation of staff members; program development; the budgeting process and fiscal management; food and health services; laws and regulations concerning state child care licensing; and parent involvement. Prerequisite: Students who attend this class need to have either a CDA or nine credits in early childhood education or the permission of the coordinator of the early childhood education program.  

ECE* 210: Observation, Participation & Seminar - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to increase objectivity in observing and interpreting children's behavior, to observe developmentally characteristics, and to increase the awareness of normal patterns of behavior. Observation and participation placements are provided for the study of young children in an approved early childhood setting. For eleven weeks, the student will observe and participate in a center for 66 hours. There is a weekly seminar.
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 212: Administrative Leadership in Early Childhood Programs - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to examine the multi-dimensional roles of the early childhood program administrator. Emphasis will be on effective leadership and the impact of communication and interpersonal skills; decision making and participatory management tools; how to conduct effective meetings; formation of partnerships with families; child welfare advocacy; and strategic approaches to initiating and implementing change.
Prerequisite: ECE* 101, ENG* 101

ECE* 215: The Exceptional Learner - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the history of treatment of children with disabilities. Course content includes legislative milestones relating to the handicapped, identification of children with special needs, and understanding the screening, assessment and evaluation process. Students also become aware of strategies for effective instruction as well as the impact on the family of a child with disabilities. 
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 225: Antibias Issues in Early Childhood Education - 3 CREDITS

This course provides students with a multicultural perspective in teaching children. Topics include diversity in the classroom and in the community. Students will explore various ethnic, religious, family, cultural, racial, and generational perspectives. Emphasis will be placed on expanding the view of diversity among students who will be taught in the 21st Century.
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 231: Early Language and Literacy Development - 3 CREDITS

This course is an introduction to language and literacy in the young child. Students will explore the early childhood language arts curriculum including speaking, listening, writing and reading skills. Emphasis will be placed on how a child's cultural background and experiences influence emerging literacy development. The teacher's role in creating and fostering a literacy-print rich environment that engages children in developmentally appropriate language arts experiences will be covered. 
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 275: Child, Family and School Relationships - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the environment in which a child develops, the relationships of people in the environment and the interactions that take place in various settings. Course content includes the development of the child as a social being, communication between parents and teachers and the ways in which teachers can encourage parent involvement.
Prerequisite: ECE* 101

ECE* 295: Student Teaching Practicum - 6 CREDITS

This course provides twelve weeks of supervised student teaching in an approved NAEYC accredited center or kindergarten. The purpose of student teaching is to apply child development theory to a learning environment and to work with children under close supervision. Student teachers will plan, organize, implement and evaluate classroom learning experiences. Students will complete 220 hours of student teaching and attend a weekly seminar class devoted to issues in Early Childhood Education and their student teaching experience.
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator and a grade of C- or better in the following ECE courses: ECE* 101, ECE* 103, ECE* 176, ECE *210, ECE* 215, and ECE* 231.

Economics

ECN* 101: Principles of Macroeconomics - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to contemporary macroeconomic thought and practices. Major concepts and tools of economic analysis covered include: unemployment, inflation, national income accounting, business cycles, growth theory, monetary policy, and investment and conception. Format is lecture/discussion, exams and/or papers. Course is required in most four-year business programs.

ECN* 102: Principles of Microeconomics - 4 CREDITS

An introduction to contemporary microeconomic thought and practices. Major concepts and tools of economic analysis covered include: market allocation of resources, prices and income distribution, prices and profits, and the labor theory of value. Course is required in most four-year business programs.

English

ENG* 043: Writing: Paragraph to Essay - 3 semester hours CREDITS

This course is designed to prepare students for English Composition 101. The course covers the basics of sentence, paragraph, and short composition writing, plus a review of the elements of English grammar and usage. Class work consists of writing practice, small group work, lecture, and library skills instruction.

ENG* 073: Academic Reading - 3 semester hours CREDITS

Focuses on reading comprehension skills needed for success in college courses. Course content includes vocabulary development, purpose and use of main ideas, details, transitions, organizational patterns, inferences and argumentation. Reading selections encompass a wide range of materials: textbooks, short stories, novels, websites, and magazine, journal, and newspaper articles.

ENG* 096: Introduction to College English - 6 semester hours CREDITS

Prepares students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college-level courses by integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking.  Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others.  Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation.  Students learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading and writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops.  This course does not satiisfy an English requriement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation.
Prerequisite: Accuplacer scores of less than 72 in Reading Comprehension and less than 68 in Sentence Skills

ENG* 101: Composition - 3 CREDITS

The objective of this course is to develop the ability to write clear, vigorous prose. Students are introduced to expository writing, focusing on thesis statement and the development of a unified, coherent essay, and exploring the kinds of writing they are asked to do most often. Students are instructed in the process of writing through activities such as brainstorming, drafting, organizing, revising, and peer collaboration. Students also learn to write a research paper and to demonstrate information literacy, including the ability to conduct online research, to evaluate information sources and to avoid plagiarism. ENG* 101 should be taken as early as possible in a student's program, preferably before completing 12-15 credit hours. 
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in ENG* 043 and ENG* 073 or ENG* 096 or appropriate placement test results.

ENG* 102: Literature & Composition - 3 CREDITS

This course introduces students to the primary forms of literature: poetry, fiction, and drama. Focus is on a detailed examination of the elements of each form of literature, and reflective and critical writing in response to literature. Students read, discuss, and write about literary works representing a rich diversity of authors' voices and backgrounds. Serves as a prerequisite for all higher-level literature courses. 
Prerequisite: "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 103: Composition II - 3 CREDITS

The focus of this course is on critical writing and reading of various types of essays: reflection, research, analysis, evaluation, argument. Building on work begun in English 101, students are instructed in the process of writing through activities such as brainstorming, drafting, organizing, revising, and peer collaboration. Students are also instructed in strategies for critical reading of essays representing a rich diversity of authors' voices and backgrounds. 
Prerequisite: "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 114: Children's Literature - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the best literature available to children including works by major writers and forms such as fable, folk tale, fairy tale, nursery rhyme, and short story. The course presents an overview of children's literature including picture books, traditional literature and contemporary children's fiction. Topics include critical analysis, the relationship of illustration and text and oral interpretation of children's literature.

ENG* 202: Technical Writing - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the writing tasks most often required in the professional world, including memos, letters, job-search correspondence, electronic correspondence, reports, technical descriptions, instructions, proposals, integrating text with graphics, and technical editing. Students will write as a recursive process that includes prewriting, drafting, workshopping, revising, and editing. 
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 206: Poetry Magazine Production I - 3 CREDITS

Students will work collaboratively and individually on a variety of tasks: organizing initial solicitation of submissions to Freshwater by designing and writing posters and flyers to send to educational institutions, as well as designing advertisements to solicit submissions from the general public; organizing and completing a variety of mailings; working on the preliminary planning of the festival, by analyzing the previous year's event, in order to learn from triumphs and disasters; organizing the annual student poetry contest, whose winners will read at the festival with their work included in Freshwater, including designing a poster and flyer and doing a mailing; preliminary reading and critiquing of submissions to Freshwater; creating and writing acceptance and rejection letters to send in response to submissions; critiquing the magazine, with an eye to improving the next issue; discussing the work of possible workshop leaders for the festival and contacting those poets to invite them to participate; working on the ongoing task of finding funding to support the magazine, through contacting local merchants and organizations for donations, and exploring grant possibilities. Students will also be required to write and revise at least five poems, working in a workshop setting to discuss and critique each other's poems, which will then be submitted for possible publication in Freshwater.  Note: The hands-on courses, Poetry Magazine Production I and II will produce Asnuntuck's poetry magazine, Freshwater, and organize the annual Freshwater Poetry Festival that celebrates the magazine's publication. Since each course will involve different aspects of producing the magazine and working on the festival, students are not required to take both courses nor to take them in sequence if they choose to take both courses. 
Prerequisite: Grade of "B" in ENG* 101 and permission of instructor

ENG* 207: Poetry Magazine Production II - 3 CREDITS

Students will continue and/or complete some of the tasks begun in Poetry Magazine Production I, but their main focus will be to work collaboratively and individually on the following tasks connected with the magazine and the festival: the final analysis and selection of poetry for Freshwater, including sending letters of acceptance and rejection, with suggestions for rewriting when appropriate; designing the layout of the magazine; working directly with the printer; editing and proofreading at various stages of the process; working on promotion and distribution of the magazine, including mailing of copies to published poets, contacting bookstores, sending out subscription copies, organizing additional readings by poets published in the magazine; organizing the festival, including publicity, such as designing and distributing posters and flyers, sending out mailings, writing and sending out press releases, and arranging interviews with various publications; final organization of workshops as well as readings by both workshop leaders and winners of the student poetry contest; finding volunteers to work with the Freshwater staff on the day of the festival; and a multitude of other tasks that are certain to require their attention when bringing out a magazine and organizing a poetry festival. As in Poetry Magazine Production I, all students will be required to write and revise at least five poems, working in a workshop setting to discuss and critique each other's poems, which will then be submitted for possible publication in Freshwater.  Note: The hands-on courses, Poetry Magazine Production I and II will produce Asnuntuck's poetry magazine, Freshwater, and organize the annual Freshwater Poetry Festival that celebrates the magazine's publication. Since each course will involve different aspects of producing the magazine and working on the festival, students are not required to take both courses nor to take them in sequence if they choose to take both courses. 
Prerequisite: Grade of "B" in ENG* 101 and permission of instructor.

ENG* 211: Short Story - 3 CREDITS

This course explores the unique elements of the short story form, with an emphasis on the modern short story and the story-telling tradition. Students will read, analyze, discuss, and practice critical writing about classic short stories and a wide range of stories from a rich diversity of authors. 
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 102

ENG* 213: Poetry - 3 CREDITS

The nature and variety of poetry, some reasonable means for reading it with appreciative understanding, and ideas of how to evaluate it. Deals with such elements as imagery, the use of figurative language--metaphor, symbol, allegory, paradox and irony, for example--and the use of rhythm and meter. Focus is on how understanding these elements adds to the delight of reading and understanding poetry, as well as giving students the confidence to approach more advanced levels of reading literature, whether formally or informally.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 102

ENG* 233: Shakespeare - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to Shakespeare's plays and the fundamentals of the genres. Students study at least one Shakespearean play intensively in addition to those covered by the class as a whole. Students explore a number of critical approaches to the study of Shakespeare.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 102

ENG* 263: Women in Poetry - 3 CREDITS

An exploration--through reading, discussing and writing poetry—of poetry and women's lives. Explores the ways in which women's poetry of the last three decades reflects what Carolyn Heilbrun calls "the narratives that have been controlling women's lives" and the ways in which many women have come to understand the need to "dismantle" the past and "reinvent" the future. Focuses on poets such as Denise Levertov, Carolyn Kizer, Maxine Kumin, Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath, and Audre Lorde, as well as a selection of contemporary women poets. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 264: Poetry and Women's Lives - 3 CREDITS

This is a course in exploration—through reading, discussion, and writing—of women, spirituality, and the ways in which women express their inner lives in their poetry. According to Marilyn Sewell, who edited Claiming the Spirit Within: A Sourcebook of Women's Poetry, much of women's contemporary poetry explores the need to reject the dominant values of our culture and "find a different way," to turn away from "our personal and cultural malaise" and explore our inner lives in order to heal ourselves and the world. In this class, we will use this idea for our exploration of women's poetry, reading and writing poetry about the spiritual and temporal lives of women and the essential ways they interconnect. Students will read the poems in Claiming the Spirit Within, keeping a reading journal as a basis for class discussion of these poems, as well as an inspiration for the poems they will write in response to the topics explored in the book. Student poems will be discussed in small groups, and students will rewrite their poems, submitting a portfolio of original and rewritten poems at the end of semester. We will also produce a book of poems written by students in the class. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 281: Creative Writing - 3 CREDITS

Students may work in poetry, fiction, drama, or a combination of these genres. Work in progress is presented each week to the class for critique and response. Readings are assigned on an individual basis. There is no limit as to the number of times a student may take this course, but a maximum of six credits will be allowed toward graduation. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 282: Creative Writing - Poetry - 3 CREDITS

Students read and write poetry in a variety of forms, including the sonnet, the villanelle, terza rima, rimas dissolutas, syllabics, and the sestina. Learn to use meter, rhyme, imagery, metaphor and other tools of writing poetry, but most of all the delight and paradoxical freedom of writing in form. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: "Grade of C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 283: Creative Writing - Fiction - 3 CREDITS

This course will focus on fiction, both to learn about the elements of fiction and to write with the techniques of fiction. Instruction will guide writing practice, and drafts of works in progress will be presented to classmates and the instructor for feedback to shape revision. Reading assignments in fiction will be assigned and self-selected with the approval of the instructor. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 101

ENG* 285: Memoir Writing - 3 CREDITS

Memoir is an increasingly popular form of writing that draws on personal history and memory as inspiration for writing about life experience. The primary focus of this class will be writing several memoir essays over the course of the semester. Students will share, discuss, revise, and explore opportunities for publishing their memoir essays. Students will also read a range of published memoir and study one author of their choosing in depth for the purpose of examining the qualities and characteristics of memoir. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" in ENG* 101 or permission of instructor

ENG* 289: Poetry and Politics: Writing to Make Change - 3 CREDITS

Poets have always written in passionate response to suffering and inequality, calling attention to the need for change, insisting that we pay attention not only to what is right and beautiful but also to what is wrong and terrible in the world. In this course, we will examine a number of questions, beginning with working toward a clear definition of politics, so that we can understand the complexity of that concept and thus comprehend the effect that politics in the broadest definition has on our lives. The other two questions we will examine are "What is political poetry?" and "What makes a good political poem"—exploring the challenge of writing poetry that tries to make a point without sliding into preaching. We will read the work of poets included in Poetry Like Bread, as well as handouts of poems by other poets, and students will explore the joys and perils of writing their own political poetry, writing a series of poems responding to topics brought up in class discussion. Student poems will be read and discussed in class, and students will produce a final portfolio of poems, rewritten in response to that class discussion. At the end of the semester, students will give a public reading of their work in the Asnuntuck Coffee House, and we will also put together a collection of work written for the course. We will be learning from each other. I welcome suggestions, and I encourage all of you to bring in additional published poems to enhance the assigned reading, so that we can broaden the scope of our exploration. You will need to provide copies for the class of any poems you bring in. This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement.  
Prerequisite: Grade of "C-" or better in ENG* 101

English as a Second Language

ESL* 131: Integrated Skills III - 3 CREDITS

This class is an academically-oriented language course for non-native students who have a simple knowledge of spoken and written English. It will emphasize general academic vocabulary development, extensive reading and listening comprehension, sentence structure and grammar, and writing and speaking improvement using linguistically controlled materials and small group interaction.
Prerequisite: An acceptable LOEP/Accuplacer placement score (combining Reading, Sentence Meaning, and Language Use subscores) or the instructor's permission

ESL* 143: Writing and Reading IV - 3 CREDITS

In this high intermediate-low advanced level class, students will strengthen reading and writing skills. Assigned readings (including whole works) and student writing form the basis of small group and class discussions. Students focus on writing and rewriting essays to develop ideas, organization, clarity and accuracy in their writing. Additional language practice activities are required and may include the use of supplemental learning software in the Computer Lab or Academic Skills Center and other audio-visual media. Assessment will be based on portfolios in addition to quizzes and exams.
Prerequisite: An acceptable LOEP/Accuplacer placement score (combining Reading, Sentence Meaning, and Language Use subtest scores), a satisfactory writing sample, or the instructor's permission

Environmental Science

EVS* 292: Current Topics in Environmental Science - 3 CREDITS

An opportunity to investigate and discuss environmental health topics and local issues that may have an impact on students. Topics include air, water and land resource use, pollution of these resources and the effect on environmental health. A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.  

Geography

GEO* 101: Introduction to Geography - 3 CREDITS

Familiarizes students with the surface of the earth so they can better understand the ways in which geography affects life. Students develop a conceptual framework of the world by analyzing interacting systems in selected places-not the development of a mere inventory of facts about a "place," but, rather, an understanding of how it functions and why it is the way it is.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

Health

HLT* 103: Investigations in Health Careers - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to assist students in meeting the expectations of a health care curriculum and career. The students will become familiar with the rigors of higher education and the specific skills needed to maximize the student's opportunity for academic and clinical success. The course will include a comprehensive overview of the duties and responsibilities associated with clinical competency. Interdisciplinary learning strategies, correlating clinical and didactic education, life management skills, work ethics, and critical thinking skills necessary for all health providers will be emphasized.

HLT* 153: Health & Wellness Today - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of current personal health concepts and applications such as health and wellness, stress management, substance use and abuse, and human sexuality. Emphasis is on decision-making skills and self-responsibility in personal health.

HLT* 154: Wellness Practices - 3 CREDITS

This course expands on the principles and theories of Psychology 103, Introduction to Holistic Wellness, focusing their premise in a practical applications format. A weekly regimen of meditation exercises, seasonal therapies, and lifestyle changes widely known to reduce stress and promote health and well-being will shape class discussion and journal-portfolio assignments. Guest speakers currently practicing in the field of complementary medicine will round out the course content.

HLT* 175: Women's Health Issues - 3 CREDITS

This course examines health topics of special interest and applicability to women, such as women's cycles, addictions, lifestyle choices, and self-concept. Part of the focus is on the role of self-understanding and self-help in promoting health and well-being. (See also PSY* 175.)

History

HIS* 101: Western Civilization I - 3 CREDITS

A survey of ancient civilization through classical Greece, Rome, and Medieval Europe to the formation of modern nation states, emphasizing the political, economic, and social development of institutions and ideas.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 102: Western Civilization II - 3 CREDITS

A survey of modern civilization in the era of the Enlightenment, the resulting social, political, and economic changes and revolutions, and the development of governments based on popular participation. A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 201: US History I - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the political, economic, social and cultural development of the United States from the pre-European period through Reconstruction. Major emphasis is on the Colonial Era, national growth, sectionalism and the Civil War. A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 202: US History II - 3 CREDITS

This course focuses on the growth of the United States from Reconstruction to the present with special emphasis on underlying political, economic and social trends and movements that have influenced American development and values. A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 213: The US Since World War II - 3 CREDITS

This course deals with both domestic and foreign affairs beginning with the Cold War through the present. The course will include the Civil Rights Movement, as well as the Vietnam War, the rise of conservatism, and the dominant concern of national security.   A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 215: History of Women in the US - 3 CREDITS

This course is a survey of the history of women and their experiences in the U.S. from the Colonial Era to the present with a special emphasis on the diversity of women's lives and contributions.   A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 222: Introduction to American Labor History - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the history of labor in the United States, beginning with the Industrial Revolution. Emphasis is on the development and operation of unions and the changing role of governments in this process.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HIS* 224: The American Indian - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to American Indian culture generally, and to four tribes in particular. Examines the condition of tribes before the coming of the Europeans, continuing to the present day, looking at the American Indian in contemporary society.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

Human Development

HDEV 101: First Year Experience - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to promote academic success by introducing first year students to the college environment and the expectations needed for college coursework. The following learning strategies, academic skills and abilities are emphasized: introduction to academic research, information literacy, paraphrasing, note-taking, academic citation systems, formulating academic-based responses, learning styles, time management, effective communication, use of Blackboard, and test-taking strategies. The course also emphasizes transfer and career planning. The course incorporates reading, writing, and speaking assignments as well as enrichment activities.

HDEV 110: Personal Finance - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to personal financial planning. Includes development of financial goals and implementing plans to achieve these goals. Course topics will include the financial planning process, economic environment, time value of money, legal environment, and financial analysis. This course is useful to all students. May not be taken by students who have completed BFN* 110: Personal Finance.

HDEV 125: Career Development - 3 CREDITS

Career-entry strategies and resources are explored to prepare students for a successful job search and to develop effective methods for career advancement. Activities include self-evaluation, goal setting, company research, personal marketing plans, resume and cover letter preparation, and interviewing practice. Mid-career planning strategies and resources are also examined to maximize advancement potential and long-term professional growth. Through practical applications, students develop product knowledge, research and planning skills, and ways to execute their job search and career-advancement strategies. Each student assembles a final portfolio to be used for career-development opportunities and needs.

Human Services

HSE* 101: Introduction to Human Services - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the basic concepts, philosophy, and historical development of national, social, and rehabilitative service. Includes professionalism, ethics, confidentiality, and rights of human services consumers. Examines the psychological, sociological, economic, and political factors which influence policy formulation in public and private social organizations.     

HSE* 175: Health and Aging - 3 CREDITS

This course will give a student an overview of the physical aging process of humans in order to provide knowledge of the age-related changes and dysfunctions which are commonly encountered within the elderly population. In addition, the health impact of those changes on the social and psychological functioning of the individual will also be examined. Prerequisite: SOC* 114: Sociology of Aging. A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite. 

HSE* 178: Community Services for the Aging - 3 CREDITS

This course will give the student an overview of the community services which are available for the elderly and the caregivers. The course will cover the philosophy, development and implementation of selected programs. Topics covered will include Medicaid, Medicare, home care programs, extended day-care facilities, and the evolving role of nursing homes (both for-profit and non-profit). In addition, students will gain an overview of community-based senior centers, politically-based senior organizations, and the developing role of respite programs.    
Prerequisite: One Sociology, Psychology, or Human Services course, or permission of instructor. A grade of C- is the passing grade for these pre-requisites.

HSE* 236: Legal Issues in Human Services - 3 CREDITS

An overview of the law as it affects the social service worker. Addresses such topics as guardianship, involuntary commitment, informed consent to medical treatment, confidentiality and the social work privilege, the rights of the client, the family and the right to privacy, social work malpractice, licensing, and the criminal justice system.  

HSE* 237: Medical Aspects of Human Services - 3 CREDITS

Many components of human services interface with medical and/or medically related facilities. Human service workers need a working knowledge of health and illness and how they impact the service recipient. Course examines limitations resulting from selected disabilities and dynamics of a number of medical conditions human service workers encounter. Students have an opportunity to explore in-depth a medical topic of their choice.
Prerequisite: HSE* 101; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite.

HSE* 241: Human Services Agencies and Organizations - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the study of community organizations and their method of practice. The objective is to analyze the practice of planning and implementation of social services programs directed toward some component of community change. The skills, methods and organizational functions of community service workers are explored and integrated into the other skills and methods of social service practice that are a part of a student's overall learning experience in the human services program.
Prerequisite: HSE* 101; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite.

HSE* 244: Managing Human Services - 3 CREDITS

An introduction and overview of the emerging and ever-changing field of human services management. New developments and knowledge in this area will be assessed with specific examples of how this information can be used in practical, day-to-day situations. Designed for any professional or student who is interested in management in human service organizations and agencies.
Prerequisite: HSE* 101 and BMG* 101 or BMG* 202; A grade of C- is the passing grade for these pre-requisites.

HSE* 244: Managing Human Services - 3 CREDITS

An introduction and overview of the emerging and ever-changing field of human services management. New developments and knowledge in this area will be assessed with specific examples of how this information can be used in practical, day-to-day situations. Designed for any professional or student who is interested in management in human service organizations and agencies. 
Prerequisite: HSE* 101 and BMG* 101 or BMG* 202; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite.

HSE* 281: Human Services Field Work I - 3 CREDITS

Provides students interested in working in human services with an opportunity to learn experientially at a human services agency in the community. Focus is on students learning how an agency functions as an organization. Students are allowed to participate in activities of the agency under the joint supervision of personnel in the assigned organization and the human service instructor.
Prerequisite: HSE* 101 and PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for these pre-requisites.

HSE* 282: Human Services Field Work II - 3 CREDITS

A continuation of Human Services Field Work I. Focus is on problems and procedures of human services work and the related agencies. Organizational structures, supervisory techniques, decision-making practice, and staff "burnout" will be examined.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in Human Services Field Work I

Humanities

HUM* 141: The Future and Organizations - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the study of the future from an organizational perspective. Emphasis is on examination of the effect population has on the future, learning different methods of futures forecasting, development of future-oriented thinking, environmental scanning techniques, and networks to increase our capabilities to address and adapt to change. (See also BBG* 125.) A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requuisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HUM* 160: An Encounter with the Holocaust - 3 CREDITS

Thinking about the unthinkable, this course explores the roots, dimensions, and effects of the destruction of six million Jews and countless other innocents during World War II. An interdisciplinary approach that draws on history, sociology, and literature.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HUM* 171: The Black Experience - 3 CREDITS

A study of the experiences of Black Americans using material from history, sociology, and literature. Attempts to illuminate the search for viable identity.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

HUM* 185: Problem Solving and Decision Making - 3 CREDITS

Develops problem-solving skills necessary to successful independent careers. Students explore different types of problems, learn various thinking skills, and develop communications abilities. Most class work is done in small groups to enhance group problem-solving skills. Innovative thinking techniques are woven into the course. Problems and problem analysis are presented from an organizational perspective. Extensive writing required. Normally offered during the spring.  A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 credits of college work

Manufacturing

Introduction to Lean Manufacturing - 0 CREDITS
This course provides you with the fundamental knowledge of current continuous process improvement methodologies in use today within competitive manufacturing environments. You will be exposed to the basic concepts of Lean Manufacturing theory and the various tools and techniques involved with a lean implementation. It will present the lean-six sigma process methodology of DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control). At the completion of the course, you will be competent to participate effectively as a team member in lean implementation projects.
Metrology - 0 CREDITS
Inspection tools are found in all companies engaged in metalworking as well as those companies that purchase metal parts from others.  These tools are required to verify that the parts meet the specifications set down by the designer. Metrology provides the student with an introduction to the construction and usage of inspection tools as well as a comprehensive set of hands-on exercises where these tools will be utilized to discover the dimensional characteristics of a variety of sample parts.
Prerequisite: Basic Math

Manufacturing Math I - 0 CREDITS
First course in manufacturing mathematics. A study of arithmetic and algebraic operations applied to manufacturing circumstances. Fractions, decimals, tolerances, percentages, signed numbers, powers and roots, the metric system, as well as ratios and proportions are studied in depth.

CAD 110: Intro to CAD (SolidWorks Design) - 3 CREDITS

SolidWorks design focuses on parametric modeling while introducing the student to the paperless, computer-based design process utilizing the mdoern parametric 3-D design software SolidWorks. The course reviews the following topics:  design process, design engineering, assembly modeling, mechanism analysis, rapid prototyping, team design, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, and the analysis of tolerance stackups.  Students will participate in individual & team design projects.

CAD* 133: CAD Mechanical AutoCAD - 3 CREDITS

Technical drafting methods of creating and presenting engineering data using current computer aided drafting software. Technical drafting topics include cartesian coordinate systems, geometric construction, orthographic projection, sectioning, isometric and oblique drawing, perspective drawing, an introduction to detail and assembly drawings, and the techniques of dimensioning including tolerance studies. Computer hardware/software topics include CAD overview, computer terminology, hardware descriptions and requirements, file manipulation and management, symbol creation, 2D and 3D geometric construction, scaling, and plotting.
Prerequisite: CSA* 105

CAD* 135: Mechanical CADKey - 3 CREDITS

Introduction to techniques of generating graphic images with computers utilizing CADKEY software in an IBM-PC environment. Computer hardware/software topics include CADKEY overview, computer terminology, hardware descriptions and requirements, file manipulation and management. Using CADKEY for 2D and 3D geometric construction, symbol library creation, scaling and plotting, sectioning, primary and secondary auxiliary views, developments, detail and assembly drawings, and the techniques of dimensioning including tolerance studies. Introduction to CADKEY Utilities. 
Prerequisite: CAD* 133

CAD* 168: CAD 2D Mechanical AutoCAD - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the techniques of generating technical drawings with computers utilizing AutoCAD software in an IBM-PC environment. The student will be introduced to AutoCAD for 2D geometric construction and technical drafting conventions in both mechanical and architectural environments. This will include creating and editing drawings, applying text, dimensioning, sectioning, and plotting. Successful completion of this course should enable the student to utilize AutoCAD to create and edit drawings, evaluate their interest in this field and provide the necessary background to take more advanced courses.
Prerequisite: CAD* 133 or consent of instructor

CAD* 201: AutoCAD Level II - 3 CREDITS

Building upon skills learned in CAD 2D Mechanical AUTOCAD, students will produce more complicated multiview drawings using AutoCAD software. This course will emphasize creation of professional drawings typical of machine production prints and architectural contract documentation. Students will create symbol libraries, utilize Internet resources for technical drawings, and will be introduced to 3D construction. 
Prerequisite: CAD* 168 or consent of instructor

CAD*110: Introduction to CAD - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the techniques of generating graphic images with computers, using AutoCAD.  Topics include: overview of CAD technology, computer technology, hardware descriptions and requirements, file manipulation and management, two-dimensional geomentric construction, symbol library creation, dimensioning, scaling, sectioning, plotting, detail and assembly drawing including tolerance studies. 

EET* 128: Basic Maintenance, Repair, Upgrading - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the hardware of a PC system. The objective of the course is to provide the student with an overview of PC hardware components to the level of the user replaceable part and their relationship with computer operating systems. The class format is a combination of lecture and lab where the student will have the opportunity to practice the techniques of disassembling, reassembling, testing, replacing and upgrading PC components and loading system software onto disk drives. (2 hours lecture/1 hour lab)
Prerequisite: Familiarity with DOS and/or Windows, or consent of instructor

MFG 296: Manufacturing Internship - 0 CREDITS

Qualification for an internship requires that students meet attendance and punctuality standards in addition to successfully completing the course prerequisites listed below.   The manufacturing internship represents the capstone of the machine technology program.  This course provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom theory, laboratory and school shop experiences in an actual work setting related to their program of study.  Thirty hours of manufacturing work are provided at affiliated sites under the guidance of the program director.
Prerequisite: MFG 124, MFG 151, MFG 152, MFG 153, MFG 154, MFG 155, MFG 156, or consent of instructor

MFG* 050: Introduction to Manufacturing Math - 3 CREDITS

An introductory course in manufacturing math designed to enable the students to enter Level I Math. Topics include numbers on graphs, tables or maps, problem solving, solutions with paper and pencil and calculators, rounding, adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers.

MFG* 071: Introduction to Blueprint Reading - 1 CREDITS

Introductory course in blueprint reading. Topics include the definition of a blueprint, classification of engineering drawings, title blocks, types of working drawings, and the Theory of Projection of drawings. 

MFG* 080: Manufacturing Graphics, Introduction to CAD/CAM - 3 CREDITS

An overview of CAD and CAM and their use in generating code to manufacture a part with a CNC machine. Topics to include Cartesian coordinates, 2D geometric construction, computer terminology, CAM fundamentals, tool path description, and machining the part.  

MFG* 091: Seminar Safety in World of Work - 2 CREDITS

An introductory course dealing with motivation, safety in the workplace, goal setting, cultural diversity, stress management, managing time, manufacturing related seminars, plant visits, and other related subjects. 

MFG* 092: Manufacturing Computers and Computer Systems - 2 CREDITS

A preliminary course in the use of the computer for manufacturing technology purposes. 

MFG* 093: Manufacturing Materials - 2 CREDITS

An introductory course in the study of materials. Topics include selection and identification of steels, selection and identification of nonferrous metals, hardening, case hardening, tempering, annealing, normalizing, stress relieving, and the use of the Rockwell and Brinell hardness testers. 

MFG* 105: Manufacturing Math II - 3 CREDITS

Second course in manufacturing mathematics. A further study of arithmetic and trigonometric operations applied to manufacturing circumstances. The following geometric entities are studied in detail: the circle, regular and irregular polygons, the right triangle and oblique triangles. The application of angular arithmetic including the study of: angle decimal conversion, the Pythagorean theorem, Sin, Cos, and Tan functions, and the Law of Sines and Law of Cosines.
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or with consent of instructor, MFG* 051: Manufacturing Math I

MFG* 113: Production Control - 3 CREDITS

A basic course in the planning and scheduling of manufacturing production activities

MFG* 114: Manufacturing Quality Control - 3 CREDITS

First course in statistical quality control. Topics covered include determination of process capabilities, estimation of process standard deviation from sample data, use of control charts, calculation of probability of simple events. Student will develop SPC and TQM Manufacturing Plans.
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or consent of instructor

MFG* 124: Blueprint Reading I - 2 CREDITS

First course in blueprint reading. The study of orthographic projection. Topics include lines and their uses, auxiliary views, sectional views, basic and special dimensioning, dimensioning practices for holes, chamfers, angle, tapers, keyways diameters and radii. Also, geometric tolerancing and dimensioning is covered. 

MFG* 125: Blueprint Reading II - 3 CREDITS

Second course in blueprint reading. A further study of simple and complex drawings for machining or assembly purposes. Topics include the application and meaning of geometric characteristics and controls, the metric system, weldment, forging and casting drawings and procedures, communication with freehand sketches, blueprint terms and abbreviations. 
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or with consent of instructor, MFG* 124: Blueprint Reading I.

MFG* 128: Blueprint Reading for Welders - 3 CREDITS

A second course in blueprint reading, the focus of which is on interpreting drawings related to the welding field. Topics include various weld and joint type symbols that are used in welding blueprints. Supplemental symbols are also covered, including size, shape, location and finish requirements of the various weldments. Interpretation of testing requirements on simple and complex blueprints is introduced.  
Prerequisite: MFG* 124

MFG* 132: Electrical Print Fundamentals - 1 CREDITS

Schematic reading and ladder logic fundamentals are essential for technicians in the industrial manufacturing process. These are the core tools for the technician to troubleshoot, de-bug, and repair complex electronic equipment. Without these tools, troubleshooting is impossible. Schematic reading provides an introduction to schematic diagrams, circuit symbols, physical layout diagrams, and component lists that will help bring all components of complex electrical circuits to an understandable level. The course will provide an overview of electronic symbols, ladder logic symbols, and the diagrams that are used to help the technician understand circuit functions.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095

MFG* 133: Math for Electricity and Electronics - 3 CREDITS

This course is intended for the student who needs in-depth knowledge of the mathematics of electronics and electricity. It will review several areas that the student may be familiar with and move into advanced areas that are necessary for the understanding of electronics functions and analysis of complex circuits. The completion of this course will enable the student to move more quickly through future courses that require the use of complex math.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095

MFG* 135: Electricity and Electronics Fundamentals - 3 CREDITS

This introductory course is required of all electronics and electro-mechanical maintenance majors and provides the student with the necessary overview of the science of electricity and electronics that is applied to the manufacturing process. Electricity and Electronics Fundamentals provides the student with a brief review of the electrical nature of matter, the flow of electricity through conductors and semiconductors that provides the basis for the electrical/electronic circuits and the laws and instruments for its measurements. The course will introduce the student to basic circuits (series, parallel, and series-parallel) and to advanced circuits (RL, RC, and RCL); to AC and DC motors; to transformers; to integrated circuits (IC's); to digital circuits (logic circuits); to personal computers (PC's) and microcontrollers.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095

MFG* 137: Circuit Theory - 3 CREDITS

Circuit Theory is an introduction to direct current (DC) circuits. Circuit Theory will introduce the student to electrical/electronic components; the nature of electricity (voltage, current, and resistance); Ohm's Law of measurement; the concept of energy and power; types of circuits (series, parallel, and series-parallel); Thevenin's and Norton's Theorems of circuit simplification, and magnetism and electro-magnetism.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095

MFG* 138: Digital Fundamentals - 3 CREDITS

Digital circuitry is the foundation of computers and automated control equipment in our industries. Digital circuitry is the basis for many of our appliances, alarm systems and heating systems. Our newer automobiles utilize digital circuits and devices to make them safer and more energy efficient. Consequently, a basic understanding of the elemental nature, design, theory, and operation of digital circuits is a must for any electronics student. This course provides the basic foundation necessary for the understanding of digital logic. The student is introduced to the concepts of digital vs. analog wave forms, digital and other numbering systems, digital codes, and Boolean algebra. The student is then introduced to the various logic gates that are incorporated into all logic systems from that of a computer to a microprocessor in a household appliance. This course explores the combinational circuits, data control devices, sequential logic (flip-flop and counters) circuits and shift registers, and finishes with an interface with the world of analog. (Formerly offered for four credits.) 
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135

MFG* 139: Circuit Theory II - 3 CREDITS

Circuit Theory II completes an introduction to the fundamental building block for all electrical and electronic devices: the circuit. Circuit Theory II completes the review of basic circuits by guiding the student through a thorough review of alternating current circuits including the RC, RL, and RLC circuits. The student will also be introduced to several electrical devices including capacitors, inductors, and transformers. (Formerly offered for four credits.) 
Prerequisite: MFG* 137

MFG* 140: Robotics - 3 CREDITS

Robotics provides the student with a brief history of the application of Robotics to the manufacturing process to date and a vision of future applications of Robotics. Robotics provides an overview of the Robotic hardware, software, and programming necessary to specific applications. Robotics reviews the following: electromechanical systems, fluid power systems, sensing systems, end-of-arm tooling, PLC's, digital electronics, programming, and industrial applications.
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139

MFG* 142: Electronic Circuits & Devices - 3 CREDITS

Electronic circuits and devices are commonplace in the industrial manufacturing process; consequently, a complete understanding of control circuits and devices is necessary for anyone who intends to have a career in manufacturing control, maintenance, or engineering. Electronic Circuits & Devices provides an introduction to electronic materials, components, circuits, devices and their applications. The course will provide an overview of semiconductors, diodes, transistors (bi-polar, field-effect and unijunction), applications of SCR and Triac to circuits, and application of components to rectifiers, amplifiers, and relays.
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139

MFG* 143: Industrial Motor Controls - 3 CREDITS

The process of motor control is integral to the flow of the product from raw material to finished product. Industrial Motor Controls will familiarize you with the following: principles of solid-state control devices and their components (such as: semiconductors, PN junction, Zenor diodes, and the transistors); AC and DC motor controls; motor drives; control circuits; motor starters and pilot devices.
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139, MFG* 142

MFG* 145: Electronic Variable Speed Drive Systems - 3 CREDITS

The flow of product in the manufacturing process can be as simple as an on/off motor control switch or as complex as a variable speed drive that incorporates a feedback system. Most large and small companies utilize the more technologically advanced systems, hence they incorporate one or more variable speed drive(s) in their production process. Electronic Variable Speed Drive Systems will introduce the student to AC and DC drive fundamentals, switching amplifier field current controllers, SCR armature voltage controllers, brushless DC motor controllers, chopper circuits, voltage inverters, and flux vector drives.
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139, MFG* 143

MFG* 146: Programmable Logic Controllers - 3 CREDITS

The incorporation of the PLC is one of the fastest growing sectors in the field of electronics as the PLC replaces electromechanical control system, such as electromagnetic relays and programmable logic devices (PLD's). Programmable Logic Controllers provides you with an overview of the PLC, its hardware, numbering systems and codes, logic fundamentals, programming timers and counters, program control and data manipulation instructions, math instructions, sequencers and shift register instructions, and PLC installation, editing and troubleshooting. (Formerly offered for four credits.) 
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139

MFG* 147: MicroProcessor/MicroController - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to give the student an overview of the microprocessor and microcontroller by reviewing the fundamentals of 8085A architecture, software, and interface applications; and by reviewing the architecture, software, and interface applications of the 8051 microcontroller. 
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139

MFG* 151: Manufacturing Machining: Drill Press and Saw - 1 CREDITS

Course on sawing and drilling machines. Topics covered include use of cutoff saws, use of drill presses, using the vertical band saw, drilling tools, countersinking, reaming and counterboring.

MFG* 152: Manufacturing Machining: Grinding - 2 CREDITS

Course on the use of various grinding machines. Topics covered include selection and identification of grinding wheels, truing, dressing and balancing wheels, grinding fluids, using the horizontal spindle reciprocating table surface grinder, using the cylindrical grinder, and using the tool and cutter grinder.

MFG* 153: Manufacturing Machining: Benchwork - 2 CREDITS

A basic course in the fundamentals, principles, practices and tools used in semi-precision and precision layout and in the various tools used in semi-precision and precision layout and in the various tools, methods, and procedures for common machine shop benchwork.  Topics include measurement systems, layout principles, hand tools, and power tools.

MFG* 154: Manufacturing Machining: Lathe I - 2 CREDITS

First  course in the use of the lathe. Topics include identification of major components of the lathe, tool holders and tool holding, cutting tools, operating the controls, facing and center drilling.

MFG* 155: Manufacturing Machining - Milling I - 2 CREDITS

First course on the vertical and horizontal milling machines. Topics to include cutting tools and holders, setups, spindles and arbors, work holding methods. 

MFG* 156: Manufacturing Machinery - CNC I - 2 CREDITS

First course in CNC machinery and programming. Topics include Cartesian coordinates, safe use of CNC equipment, setup and operate a two axis CNC lathe and a three axis CNC machining center, programming and runoff of parts. 

MFG* 157: Welding I - 3 CREDITS

Introduction to theory and lab activities in welding areas of Shielded Metal Arc Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Gas Metal Arc Welding and Oxyfuel Welding processes. Safety issues, equipment knowledge and demonstration of various welding processes/techniques will be explored.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095

MFG* 158: Pneumatics and Hydraulics - 3 CREDITS

Fluid power is on the increase in the process of manufacturing due to its simplicity and to cost effectiveness. Hence, any person who wishes to be involved in the manufacturing process in a repair, control or engineering role should be familiar with the fundamentals of pneumatics and hydraulics. This introductory course is a study of the principles, concepts and equipment used in the field of pneumatics and hydraulics. Course emphasis is placed upon systems design, applications, and maintenance and repair. The following concepts are reviewed in this course: fluid power principles, fluid power cylinders, control valves (3 & 4 and 4 & 5 way), fluid power pumps, and other fluid power components. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and permission of the Director of Manufacturing Technology

MFG* 159: Industrial Maintenance - 3 CREDITS

The Industrial Maintenance course is designed to give the student an overview of the electro-mechanical nature of industry. Even though electronic devices have made great inroads in industry, the mechanical nature of production remains nearly unchanged over the years. The expression "the wheels of industry" remains as true today as it did yesterday. This course will provide the skills necessary to install and to maintain the electronic and mechanical parts and machines that provide the ability of manufacturers to produce products, e.g. automobiles, appliances, etc. The course covers the following areas: safety, tools, fasteners, industrial print reading, belts and sheaves, chains and sprockets, gears and gear boxes, bearings, shafts, lubrication, seals and packing, pumps and compressors, fluid power, piping systems, and preventive maintenance.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and permission of the Director of Manufacturing Technology

MFG* 162: CNC Maintenance and Repair I - 3 CREDITS

CNC Maintenance and Repair I is the first course of a two-semester course sequence that provides the student with an introduction to Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machinery including the CNC miller and CNC lathe. Topics include: CNC safety, basic CNC components, basic operations of a CNC, overview of the control unit and operator's unit, CNC part programming, CNC operation and interfacing (PMC system), measurement devices, and troubleshooting techniques. This course is designed to give the student an in-depth overview of the design, programming, and operation of CNC machinery, thereby providing the foundation for CNC maintenance and repair. 
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139, MFG* 140, MFG* 142, MFG* 143, MFG* 145, MFG* 146, MFG* 147 or consent of instructor and successful completion of Manufacturing Electronics Fundamentals and Manufacturing Electronics Systems & Controllers o

MFG* 163: CNC Maintenance and Repair II - 3 CREDITS

CNC Maintenance and Repair II is the second course of a two-semester course sequence and provides the student basic troubleshooting strategies, explores all major CNC systems needing maintenance and repair, reviews troubleshooting techniques used to identify components in need of repair, and provides insights into making the necessary repairs. Topics include: Troubleshooting plan of action (strategy); troubleshooting power supplies, troubleshooting the interlock system and operator controls; troubleshooting the servo drive, interface, parameter, and I/O (input/output) systems; and troubleshooting the hydraulic and pneumatics, lubrication and mechanical systems. The course provides the rationale for establishing and utilizing a regular maintenance plan.
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139, MFG* 140, MFG* 142, MFG* 143, MFG* 145, MFG* 146, MFG* 147, MFG* 162 or consent of instructor and successful completion of Manufacturing Electronics Fundamentals and Manufacturing Electronics Systems & Con

MFG* 164: Electro-Mechanical Seminar/Internship - 4 CREDITS

The Electro-Mechanical Internship is designed to be a capstone activity. The student is required to have completed successfully both electronic certificate programs, Manufacturing Electronics Fundamentals and Manufacturing Electronics Systems & Controllers, and to be in the latter stage of their Mechanical Certificate Program. The internship will commence within the last four (4) weeks of the Mechanical Certificate semester and will require sixty (60) hours of electro-mechanical industrial maintenance and repair supervised activity. Regional manufacturers will provide the student with on-site laboratory activities in regular maintenance and in repair. The student will be required to troubleshoot CNC mill, lathe and other electronically driven equipment in need of repair under the direct supervision of qualified company staff. Time will be provided in Pneumatics and Hydraulics, Industrial Maintenance, and CNC Maintenance and Repair to discuss, to review, and to reinforce the troubleshooting and maintenance experiences learned at the work site.
Prerequisite: MFG* 133, MFG* 135, MFG* 137, MFG* 138, MFG* 139, MFG* 140, MFG* 142, MFG* 143, MFG* 145, MFG* 146, MFG* 147 or consent of instructor and successful completion of Manufacturing Electronics Fundamentals and Manufacturing Electronics Systems & Controllers o

MFG* 172: Introduction to Lean Supply Chain Management - 3 CREDITS

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of methodologies of Supply Chain Management. The course reviews the lean manufacturing principles needed to understand and maintain the supply chain. Key concepts are covered such as Value Stream Mapping, customer/supplier roles, supplier types, metrics, quality systems, quality audits, communication, and information flow. Class activities, group assignments, and case studies are emphasized for real-world learning experiences. 

MFG* 225: Industrial Safety - 3 CREDITS

This course studies industrial accident prevention and industrial hygiene covering such topics as management's responsibilities and functions in accident prevention. Topics include: OSHA regulations, machine guarding techniques and personal protective equipment, fire prevention and control, electrical and hand tool hazards, employee training and communications, injury data, hazards, accident analysis and hygiene problems caused by industrial environments. 

MFG* 230: Statistical Process Control - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to the concepts of manufacturing statistical process control. Topics include: measures of central tendency, measures of variation, normal distribution theory, process run charts, process control charts for variable and attributable data, normal probability plots, Pareto diagrams and cause-and-effect diagrams.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 137

MFG* 239: Geometric Dimension and Tolerancing - 3 CREDITS

An intermediate course in the interpretation of engineering drawings, beginning with the basics of dimensional tolerances and tolerance systems. Topics include: the mathematics of interpreting and specifying tolerances on dimensions, the system and rules of geometric tolerancing, and the basic nomenclature and standard symbols conforming to ANSI/ASME Y14.5M 1994 standards. 
Prerequisite: MFG* 125: Blueprint Reading II

MFG* 254: Manufacturing Machinery - Lathe II - 3 CREDITS

Second course on lathe setup, operation and practices. Topics covered include alignment, turning between centers, and other operations. The student will cut 60 degree external threads, internal threads, tapers, and other thread forms. Use of steady rests and follower rests.
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or with consent of instructor, MFG* 154: Manufacturing Machinery - Lathe I

MFG* 255: Manufacturing Machinery - Milling II - 3 CREDITS

Second course on milling setup, operation, and practices. Topics covered include use of Offset Boring Head, side milling cutters, face milling cutters on the horizontal mill, setup and operation of index heads, simple and direct angular indexing, and inspection of gears. 
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or with consent of instructor, MFG* 155: Manufacturing Machinery - Milling I

MFG* 256: Manufacturing Machinery - CNC II - 3 CREDITS

Second course in Computer Numerical Controlled programming. A further study of CNC programming for the Lathe and Vertical Machining Center. Topics include setup and tooling, programming simple parts, canned drilling cycles, circular interpolation, special milling cycles, cutter compensation, looping and macros, and special features.
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or with consent of instructor, MFG* 156: Manufacturing Machinery - CNC I

MFG* 257: Welding II - 3 CREDITS

Theory and advanced lab activities in welding areas of Shielded Metal Arc Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Gas Metal Arc Welding and Oxyfuel processes. Safety issues, advanced equipment knowledge and proficiency in various welding processes/techniques will be developed further in preparation for Welding III.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 124, and MFG* 157

MFG* 265: Welding III - 3 CREDITS

Advanced theory and lab activities that prepare the student to make code acceptable weldments in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) in various positions and upon various metals.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 125, and MFG* 257

MFG* 266: Welding IV - 3 CREDITS

This is an advanced course that includes theory and lab activities that prepare the student to make Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) code acceptable weldments in plate and pipe in all positions. 
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 125, and MFG* 265

MFG* 267: Metallurgy - 3 CREDITS

This is an introductory course that reviews the basic principles of metallurgy. This course will describe their uses in industrial applications and explain why certain material properties are desired and how these properties are attained.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095 and MFG* 265

MFG* 268: Welding V - 3 CREDITS

This advanced welding course includes theory and lab activities that prepare students to make GTAW code acceptable weldments upon specialty metals such as aluminum, magnesium, copper and steel alloys, stainless steel, and titanium. Lab activities will include code acceptable weldments. 
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 124, MFG* 125, MFG* 157, MFG* 257, MFG* 265, MFG* 266

MFG* 269: Welding VI - 3 CREDITS

This advanced welding course includes theory and lab activities that prepare students to make GMAW and FCAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux Cored Arc Welding) code acceptable weldments on various metals.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 124, MFG* 125, MFG* 157, MFG* 257, MFG* 265, MFG* 266, MFG* 268

MFG* 270: Welding Automation and Other Welding Processes - 3 CREDITS

This advanced welding course introduces the student to automatic and specialty welding processes. The student will review semiautomatic, automatic, robotic, CNC, resistance welding, LBW, as well as other welding procedures.
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 124, MFG* 125, MFG* 157, MFG* 257, MFG* 265, MFG* 266, MFG* 268, MFG* 269

MFG* 271: Advanced Lean Manufacturing - 3 CREDITS

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge to implement lean improvements within the production environment using a systematic approach. This course will follow an improvement project (from the student's current employer or case study) through the five stages of the DMAIC problem solving methodology. At the completion of the course, the student will be competent to effectively lead a lean implementation project within a company.
Prerequisite: MFG* 171

MFG* 272: Implementing Lean Supply Chain Management - 3 CREDITS

The course covers the benefits and elements needed for implementing supply chain management. Team building and communication skills are shown as crucial factors in supply chain management. Topics emphasized in the course are measuring the velocity of the supply chain, developing partnerships, logistics, software tools, hardware, and continuous improvement. Class activities, group assignments and case studies are emphasized for real-world learning experiences. 
Prerequisite: MFG* 172

MFG* 273: Welding Codes, Testing, and Certifications - 3 CREDITS

This advanced course prepares students to become certified in one or several welding requirements. Certification tests are designed to ensure that the weldment meets specific standards as to the specific welding process, type and thickness of metal, joint design, position(s) and other requirements. There are many code requirements initiated by government(s) and business(es). All are designed to ensure product, building or other structural safety. This course will review American Welding Society (AWS) structural welding code(s) and will prepare the student for such requirements. AWS Aerospace specification AWS D17.1 will also be reviewed. 
Prerequisite: MAT* 095, MFG* 124, MFG* 125, MFG* 157, MFG* 257, MFG* 265, MFG* 266, MFG* 268, MFG* 269

MFG* 296: Manufacturing Internship - 0 CREDITS

The manufacturing internship represents the capstone of the machine technology program. This course provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom theory, laboratory and school shop experiences in an actual work setting related to their program of study. Thirty hours of manufacturing work are provided at affiliated sites under the guidance of the program director.
Prerequisite: MFG* 124, MFG* 151, MFG* 152, MFG* 153, MFG* 154, MFG* 155, MFG* 156, or consent of instructor

QUA 114: Principles of Quality Control - 3 CREDITS

First course in statistical quality control. Topics covered include determination of process capabilities, estimation of process standard deviation from sample data, use of control charts, calculation of probablity of simple events. Student will develop SPC and TQM manufacturing plans.
Prerequisite: Completion of Machine Technology Level I Certificate, or consent of instructor

Mathematics

MAT* 075: Prealgebra – Number Sense, Geometry - 3 semester hours CREDITS

A concentrated review of beginning algebra concepts and basic arithmetic skills. Includes basic computations, signed numbers, equation solving, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percents, geometry, and applications.  
Prerequisite: A grade of C is the passing grade for pre-requisites in this category unless otherwise noted.

MAT* 095: Elementary Algebra Foundations - 3 semester hours CREDITS

An introduction to algebra. Includes a study of signed numbers, operations on polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, graphing, linear and quadratic equations, radicals, exponents, and applications.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 075 or Mathematics Assessment Test

MAT* 123: Elementary Statistics - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to some of the concepts and techniques of descriptive basic statistics, probability and normal distributions sampling theory, statistical inferences, linear regression, linear correlation, and the Chi-square distribution. Computer instructional software is used to enhance the student's experience.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 095 or MAT* 121

MAT* 137: Intermediate Algebra - 3 CREDITS

A further study of algebra. Includes a study of functions and mathematical modeling as applied to polynomials, rational expressions, linear and quadratic equations, radicals, and exponents. Graphing calculator required; TI83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 095 or Mathematics Assessment Test

MAT* 146: Mathematics for the Liberal Arts - 3 CREDITS

MAT* 146 is a survey course for students whose major field of study requires no specific mathematical preparations, such as in liberal arts and general studies. It is designed to convey the nature and diversity of mathematics and its role in society through applications to a variety of disciplines. Mathematics topics include voting theory, financial mathematics, and additional topics such as the following: graph theory, patterns and symmetry, linear and exponential applications, introduction to probability, linear programming, cryptography, the performance arts, and history of mathematics. Graphing calculator required; TI 83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 137: Intermediate Algebra, Placement Test, or SAT score.

MAT* 152: Finite Mathematics - 3 CREDITS

A survey of the use of mathematics in the social sciences. Includes a study of set theory, logic, combinatorial analysis, probability, statistics, math of finance and geometric linear programming. Emphasis will be on the construction and interpretation of mathematical models. Graphing calculator required; TI83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 137 or Mathematics Assessment Test

MAT* 167: Principles of Statistics - 3 CREDITS

The purpose of this course is to enable students to organize, present, and analyze data by applying descriptive and inferential statistical methods and processes. Topics include exploratory data analysis, graphing techniques, measures of central tendency and variability, the normal distribution, correlation and regression, basic sampling theory, mean and proportion sampling distributions, confidence intervals, statistical inference, elements of hypothesis testing, one and two sample tests for means and proportions, and analysis of variance. Graphing calculator required; TI84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 137 or Placement Test

MAT* 186: Precalculus - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to analysis skills necessary for success in the study of calculus. Includes study of inequalities, absolute value function, algebraic relations and algebraic functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Extensive use is made of the programmable-graphing calculator and mathematical software. Graphing calculator required; TI83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 137

MAT* 254: Calculus I - 4 CREDITS

Includes a study of functions, limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions, applications of derivatives, definite integrals, approximate integration, and applications of the definite integral. Mathematical software and programmable-graphing calculators are used extensively. Graphing calculator required; TI83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 186

MAT* 256: Calculus II - 4 CREDITS

Includes a further study of differentiation of trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions as well as an exploration of the techniques of integration, improper integrals, indeterminate forms, and infinite series. Mathematical software and programmable-graphing calculators are used extensively. Graphing calculator required; TI83 or 84 recommended.  
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 254

MAT* 268: Calculus III: Multivariable - 4 CREDITS

Includes vectors in three dimensions, curves and parametric equations in three dimensions, geometry of surfaces, differential calculus of functions of more than one variable with applications, multiple integrals and their applications, and the differential and integral calculus of vector fields. Mathematical software and use of programmable-graphing calculators to solve problems included. Graphing calculator required; TI83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 256

MAT* 285: Differential Equations - 3 CREDITS

Introduction to ordinary differential equations and their applications, linear differential equations, systems of first order linear equations, numerical methods. Graphing calculator required. TI83 or 84 recommended.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MAT* 256

Music

MUS* 141: Guitar - 3 CREDITS

This course is designed to offer students an introduction to guitar performance. No previous musical training is required or assumed. Through the study of easy solo repertoire pieces, the student will learn musical notation and general music theory. Development of left and right hand technique and good practice habits will be stressed. The student will also work on the important musicianship skill of auditory training: recognition of pitch, intervals and tone at an introductory level and basic improvisation. Students will form small groups for the purpose of practicing in ensemble. Students must provide their own instruments. All MUS* courses satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.

MUS* 142: Guitar II - 3 CREDITS

This course is a continuation of Guitar I. Through the study of classic solo and ensemble pieces that gradually increase the sophistication and difficulty, we will continue the learning of musical notation and general music theory as it applies to guitar performance. Continued emphasis of left and right hand technique, good practice habits, and performance etiquette will be stressed. In this course, we will advance our understanding of the fingerboard into fifth (V) position and will study music and chord development in keys other than C major. We will also expand our working knowledge of harmony to extend into 7th chords, introduce standard jazz repertoire and practice basic improvisation through the study of keys/modes and diatonic scale relationships.  All MUS* courses satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.
Prerequisite: MUS* 141 or permission of instructor.

MUS* 171: Chorus I - 3 CREDITS

Study of vocal production, technique, and interpretation, with application through study and performance of various types of choral music. A study through rehearsal and performance of music literature for choir. Emphasis is given to the preparation of choral works. Opportunities exist for solo and ensemble singing in smaller groups. Participation in general college chorale public performance.  All MUS* courses satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.  

Oceanography

OCE* 101: Introduction to Oceanography - 3 CREDITS

An introduction to ocean science, designed to familiarize students with basic oceanographic principles and current issues concerning humans' relation with the ocean. Topics include: physical characteristics of the ocean (light, salinity, density, temperature), waves, tides and currents; the ocean floor; ocean zones; types and classification of marine life; effects of the environment on marine life; marine ecology; marine resources (biological and physical); ocean pollution and its effects on marine life; marine law; and nautical charts.   

Philosophy

PHL* 101: Introduction to Philosophy - 3 CREDITS

We will focus on the questioning of ideas, inquiry into modern philosophical problems, and appreciation for the wonder of the mind, thinking process, and the 'critical' eye. Areas of thought to be studied include knowledge and reality, religious belief, morality, social philosophy, and personal philosophy. 'Doing' philosophy is emphasized. A historical view of changing concepts, and thoughtful consideration of our own time, place, and multi-cultured society.  

PHL* 111: Ethics - 3 CREDITS

Such fundamental issues as social morality and individual rights, justice, and the nature of the good life are explored through historical and contemporary writings. Areas of study include multiculturalism in our democracy, and ethical issues in business, medicine, and media. The ends sought for every student are a stronger sense of consistency between intention and behavior, and growing skills of critical analysis.  

PHL* 151: World Religions - 3 CREDITS

Survey of the structures of major world religions and the social and political consequences of such beliefs. Covers varieties of Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and the various Muslim sects. Others are studied as time allows.

Physical Education

HPE* 261: Yoga - 1 CREDITS

This class is an introduction to Hatha yoga postures. The class consists of fundamental yoga techniques to stretch, tone and relax each part of the body. Students learn basic warm-ups, postures, and exercises. Correct breathing and relaxation techniques are also introduced. Beginners and individuals with injuries and physical limitations should start at this beginner level. Modifications are given to provide both safety and the appropriate challenge for students. The Sun Salutation sequence is also introduced to students. No previous training is required or assumed. Graded pass/fail.  

HPE* 262: Yoga Level I - 1 CREDITS

In addition to the material offered in beginner's level, HPE* 261: Yoga, this class offers increased challenges to those who have become comfortable with entry level material. Students practice holding postures longer to build greater strength and stamina. Alignment and form are studied in more depth at this level. More advanced sequencing of postures is introduced and practiced. Students should have a working understanding of the principles and practice of beginning yoga to fully benefit from this course. Graded pass/fail.
Prerequisite: HPE* 261 or permission of instructor.

Physics

PHY* 121: General Physics I - 4 CREDITS

Basic concepts of mechanics and thermodynamics. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.)
Prerequisite: MAT* 137 with a grade of "C" or better, or two years of high school algebra, or math assessment test.

PHY* 122: General Physics II - 4 CREDITS

Basic concepts of electricity and magnetism, vibration and wave motion, light and optics, and modern physics. (3 hours lecture/3 hours lab.)
Prerequisite: PHY* 121 with a grade of "C" or better.

PHY* 221: Calculus-Based Physics - 4 CREDITS

Basic facts and principles of physics. Elementary concepts of calculus are used. Classical dynamics, rigid body motion, harmonic motion, wave motion, acoustics, relativistic dynamics, and thermodynamics. Students will be able to transfer to UConn only two of the four credits awarded for this course if they have already received credit for PHY* 121.
Prerequisite: Co-requisites: PHY* 110 or secondary school physics and MAT* 268.

PHY* 222: Calculus-Based Physics II - 4 CREDITS

Electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, quantum effects, introduction to atomic physics. Students will be able to transfer to UConn only two of the four credits awarded for this course if they have already received credit for PHY* 122.
Prerequisite: PHY* 221

Political Science

POL* 103: Introduction to International Relations - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the major theories, structures and issues in the study of global politics with an emphasis on significant trends including international organizations, the problem of war, economic globalization and the global environment.  

POL* 111: American Government - 3 CREDITS

This course is an introduction to the foundations and institutions (legislative, executive and judicial) of American politics as well as the key concept of political participation in America with an emphasis on current issues and problems at the national level.  

POL* 112: State and Local Government - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the role, functions, and processes of state and local governments with an emphasis on the diversity and revitalization of state governments as key factors in addressing public policy issues. This course draws heavily from ongoing events in state governments particularly in Connecticut in order to identify the key problems facing states and localities.  

POL* 208: American Public Policy - 3 CREDITS

This course investigates the policy-making process in the United States. Using a functional approach, students analyze public policy in a sequential manner, from the initial identification of a problem to its solution, including the assessment and appropriate revision or termination of policy. Examines case studies and analyzes current policy issues.  

POL* 212: Constitutional Law and Civil Rights - 3 CREDITS

Introduction to individual rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court, the Bill of Rights and their application to individual states, the significance of constitutional law, and how judges' interpretation of the Constitution transforms society. (See also CJS* 210.)  

POL* 295: Political Science Internship - 6-12 CREDITS

An opportunity to work closely in a political setting, either with a local legislator or in an office of the legislature. Written permission of the instructor is required.

Psychology

PSY* 104: Psychology of Adjustment - 3 CREDITS

This course examines personal adjustment, personal growth, and interpersonal relationships over the lifespan. We examine those changes within personal and social contexts. Students gain knowledge of topics that relate to understanding others and ourselves in a changing world including motivation, emotions, stress, work, the body and health, human sexuality, freedom and decision making. Events, individuals and choices are interrelated. This course examines those connections and their impact on the individual.  

PSY* 109: Psychology of the Family - 3 CREDITS

This course is a study of American family dynamics along with the psychological conditions influencing them. The course examines the micro perspective of family dynamics. Topics include marriage, power, conflict and communication in families, birth order and its effects on mating and parenting styles, family stress and crises, divorce, remarriage and family life from an individual and social-psychological perspective. The course focuses on the psychological impact families have on individual members.  

PSY* 111: General Psychology I - 3 CREDITS

A survey course that provides an overview of introductory topics in the science of psychology.  Topics include historical and scientific origins, life span development, research, biological foundations, learning, memory, thinking, language, intelligence, motivation,  and emotion. PSY 111 This course is the first half of a two semester sequence of PSY* 111 and 112.  PSY* 111 is recommended, but not required prior to taking PSY* 112. 

PSY* 112: General Psychology II - 3 CREDITS

A survey of psychology as a behavioral science. Topics include sensation and perception, states of consciousness, theories of personality, social psychology, abnormal psychology, therapeutic treatment, and health psychology. This course is the second half of a two semester sequence of PSY* 111 and 112. PSY* 111 is recommended, but not required prior to taking PSY* 112.  

PSY* 140: Psychology of Addiction - 3 CREDITS

This course provides an overview of addiction including potential causes and personal/social consequences. Addiction is examined from a number of perspectives. Topics include: alcohol, heroin, cocaine, food, sex, love (relationships) and work. Included is an examination of current state and federal legislation related to specific addictions. Course content includes a variety of treatment modalities utilized in addressing the symptomatology of addiction. This course cannot be substituted for any of the required courses in the Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Counseling Program (DARC).
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 143: Counseling Skills - 3 CREDITS

This course explores the role of the counselor in a variety of therapeutic settings. Topics include theories of counseling, various counseling models, individual and group counseling, components of successful counseling, and conditions leading to and ways to prevent burnout. Students have the opportunity to practice a variety of counseling techniques. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 201: Life Span Development - 3 CREDITS

This course explores the development of the whole person from the prenatal period through old age. We examine the stages and issues related to social, emotional, intellectual, and physical development. Developmental principles are applied to understand family issues, communication, self-image, and adjustments to life's transitions. Students learn both theory and practice.
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for pre-requisites

PSY* 203: Child Development - 3 CREDITS

This course examines contemporary ideas and issues in child psychology. It includes such topics as cognition, intelligence, language, early experiences, genetics, sex typing, moral development, and the significant developmental changes that occur in the child. Objectives include introducing students to modern methods of the study of children; increasing interest, understanding, and concern for children. Topics include learning, motivation, perception, and personality from a developmental point of view.
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 204: Child and Adolescent Development - 3 CREDITS

A study of the changes in the individual from infancy through adolescence. This survey course examines the theories and methodologies of the cognitive, emotional, and social development of the individual during childhood and adolescence. We employ both theory and practice in our approach to the material.
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 207: Adolescent Psychology - 3 CREDITS

This course provides the student with a broad theoretical and practical basis for the understanding of this dynamic period of development. Theoretical models are reviewed within the context of important issues of the adolescent experience. Cultural differences and similarities will also be presented throughout the course.
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 210: Death & Dying - 3 CREDITS

This course examines contemporary and cultural attitudes toward death and dying, and the process of grief and loss. Students are provided with the opportunity to understand the approach toward death from psychological, sociological, moral, and ethical perspectives. A number of issues of the multifaceted concept of death are explored including: death of children, death due to accidents, factors that precipitate death, the personal struggle of the terminally ill, and the impact of death on the family and significant others. The ethical issue of terminating life is also explored.
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 211: Psychology of Women - 3 CREDITS

This course examines leading psychological theories and issues about women in contemporary society. Consideration is given to societal expectations and personality development as well as to achievement motivation and identity formation.
Prerequisite: PSY* 104 or PSY* 111; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 212: Health Psychology - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the effects of cognitive and emotional states and the environment on wellness. Students learn a variety of theories and research methods used to evaluate the impact of acute and chronic illness on psychological health. Students learn a variety of coping skills to promote sound psychological wellbeing. Prevention, stress management, psychotropic intervention, talk therapy, and other coping strategies are examined.
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisites

PSY* 215: Psychology of Dreaming - 3 CREDITS

This course surveys the physiology of the dreaming process in the context of stages of sleep and the neurobiology of dream states. The psychology of Freud, Jung and Gestalt psychologists are applied to an understanding of the dream process and dream interpretation. The course also examines the influence of culture and myth upon the dreaming process and the dreamer. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 220: Educational Psychology - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the basic theories of learning and teaching. The focus of the course will be on the learning process and related ideas such as development, individual differences, cognition, effective learning environments, motivation and exceptionalities. Students learn a variety of theoretical constructs that pertain to learning and the educational environment. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 220: Educational Psychology - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the basic theories of learning and teaching. The focus of the course will be on the learning process and related ideas such as development, individual differences, cognition, effective learning environments, motivation and exceptionalities. Students learn a variety of theoretical constructs that pertain to learning and the educational environment.  
Prerequisite: PSY* 111; A grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 240: Social Psychology - 3 CREDITS

This course is a survey of theory and research in social psychology, including the topics of conformity, obedience, attitudes and persuasion, group dynamics, the self, forming impressions and explaining behavior, altruism, aggression, romantic attraction, prejudice, and social conflict.
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 243: Theories of Personality - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the nature of personality and practical implications for everyday living from the viewpoints of major personality theorists. The psychodynamic, behavioristic, ego psychology, humanistic, and transpersonal models are included. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 245: Abnormal Psychology - 3 CREDITS

This course is an inquiry into social and cultural perspectives of abnormal behavior, focusing on clinical situations, causal factors, therapy, and the outcomes of various maladaptive behaviors. Contemporary approaches to assessment, treatment, and prevention of abnormal behavior are considered. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 250: Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality - 3 CREDITS

This course explores current information, attitudes, and place of sexuality as a positive and enriching force in life. Biological origins, psychological determinants, social factors, and various forms of sexual expression are considered. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 104 or PSY* 111; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 256: Psychology of Gender - 3 CREDITS

This course examines the different roles of men and women from a psychological perspective, examining both traditional roles and the current changing roles of men and women. Students explore psychological messages about masculinity and femininity, media messages, and patterns of communication.  
Prerequisite: PSY* 104 or PSY* 111; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

PSY* 270: Psychology of Trauma - 3 CREDITS

This course introduces students to the field of psychological trauma. It includes a brief history of the field, as well as current approaches to understanding trauma from cognitive, neuropsychological, developmental, and clinical viewpoints. It explores topics such as childhood trauma, adult sexual assault, domestic violence, acts of war, combat related disorders, and natural disasters. Films and selected readings are used to explore these topics. A disclaimer is communicated at the beginning of class concerning possible accidental trauma to students because of the nature of the materials covered. A list of area providers of psychological services is distributed in class. 
Prerequisite: PSY* 112; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

Sign Language

SGN* 101: Sign Language - 3 CREDITS

American Sign Language (ASL) is the sign language most deaf people use when communicating among themselves. Students will learn grammatical features, vocabulary and conversational skills including expressive and receptive skills of ASL. In addition, students will learn the culture of the deaf community, the history of ASL, and the relationship of ASL to other forms of signing.  

SGN* 102: Sign Language II - 3 CREDITS

This course is a continuation of Sign Language I. Students will learn grammatical features, vocabulary and conversational skills including expressive and receptive skills of ASL. In addition, students will learn the culture of the deaf community, the history of ASL, and the relationship of ASL to other forms of signing.  
Prerequisite: SGN* 101

Sociology

SOC* 101: Principles of Sociology - 3 CREDITS

This course introduces the sociological perspective as a way to look at and make sense of our complex and changing world. Students study basic concepts, principles, and methods of sociological analysis. Subject areas include culture, social structure, socialization, groups, social inequity, and social change, taught using a global perspective. This is an introductory class designed to be a student's first experience with the study of sociology at the college level. Students will be prepared to either go on to higher-level sociology classes and/or use this basic understanding of sociological thinking as a foundation for greater understanding of themselves and society.  

SOC* 114: Sociology of Aging - 3 CREDITS

An overview of all the pertinent aspects of aging. Students gain an understanding of the aging process including the biological, psychological, and sociological factors. Physiological changes are discussed from the perspective of life span development. Emotional and behavioral components of aging are presented. The socially changing role of the elderly is also examined. Includes contemporary problems that face senior citizens.  

SOC* 117: Minorities in the U.S. - 3 CREDITS

A study of the social, economic, and political conditions affecting the status of major ethnic and racial groups in the United States. Attention is focused on selected minority groups, emphasizing patterns of immigration, intercultural conflict, accommodation, and assimilation.  

SOC* 120: Group Dynamics - 3 CREDITS

An overview of the dynamics of human interaction in small groups. Students study the dynamics of the small group through direct experience and analysis of group process, and through the major theories of small group development. Some topics to be covered are leadership, roles, nonverbal behavior, communicating, conflict, and power.  

SOC* 190: Self and Others: Dynamics of Diversity - 3 CREDITS

Students explore the meanings of inequality based on factors including class, race, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation as they structure individual identities, group interaction, life changes and social outcomes. Students use the sociological perspective to explore the intersections of these social differences on both academic and experiential levels. Twenty hours of service learning conducted during the semester is required.

SOC* 201: Contemporary Social Issues - 3 CREDITS

This course is a comprehensive and critical analysis of problems facing American society. Topics include race, gender, role changes, bureaucracies, education, the family, the young and old, violence, drugs, and homelessness. The impact of these problems on American social institutions is assessed.
Prerequisite: SOC* 101; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

SOC* 210: Sociology of the Family - 3 CREDITS

This course uses the sociological perspective to focus on contemporary family structures. Family is one of the major institutions in society. The course emphasizes the sociological aspects of changing family forms from a macro perspective. It examines social forces, including other social institutions, that shape the contemporary American family within a historical context. It explores changing sociological patterns of marriage, power, parenting, family crises, divorce, remarriage and alternative family lifestyles. The course focuses on the global impact of other social institutions on the family.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SOC* 101; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

SOC* 211: Sociology of Gender - 3 CREDITS

This course will examine the processes by which gender is socially constructed, along with the distinction between biological sex and gender, the causes and consequences of gender inequality, and a historical overview of gender relations in different social institutions and societies.  
Prerequisite: SOC* 101; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

SOC* 240: Criminology - 3 CREDITS

This course introduces the fundamental principles of criminology: theories related to the cause of crime, trends in criminal behavior, and problems that are encountered in the administration of the current justice system. Examines the different rehabilitative and treatment services provided to offenders. (See also CJS* 201.)
Prerequisite: SOC* 101; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

SOC* 241: Juvenile Delinquency - 3 CREDITS

This course explores the multifaceted concept of juvenile delinquency. Explores the relationship between social attitudes and definitions of youthful law violations. Examines some of the popular causal factors of juvenile delinquency.  (See also CJS* 202.)  
Prerequisite: SOC* 101; a grade of C- is the passing grade for this pre-requisite

Spanish

SPA* 101: Elementary Spanish I - 3 CREDITS

For students with little or no background in Spanish. Stresses pronunciation, aural comprehension, and conversation, as well as the principles of grammar. Reading and writing of simple Spanish are developed.  

SPA* 102: Elementary Spanish II - 3 CREDITS

A continuation of Spanish 101. Expanded grammar, pronunciation, and conversation to improve the reading, writing, and speaking of the language. Elementary reading materials for vocabulary building, exercises, and discussion.  
Prerequisite: SPA* 101

Theatre

THR* 107: History of Film - 3 CREDITS

Students view and analyze a series of films from the silent era to the present day. They explore the changes that have occurred in this art form, how it is defined, and the varied ways in which it can be understood and appreciated. An understanding of film's unique physical and spatial characteristics begins this study.  

THR* 110: Acting I - 3 CREDITS

Students read plays and participate both as actors and critics. They acquaint themselves with theater and engage in improvisations as well as in particular plays. All students do some acting and an attempt is made to videotape student actors engaged in rehearsal and performance. Some writing and directing is possible.  

THR* 210: Acting II - 3 CREDITS

The second core-acting course in the Theater Arts curriculum. This course is designed to help students reflect upon their work from Acting I in order to improve their acting skills and technique. Acting II is a performance-based class and all students are required to perform in front of the class for evaluation. The course will focus primarily on scene study and text analysis. Students will have the opportunity to analyze their own acting techniques and skills, and the work of their peers. Units of study will include improvisation, voice, physical action, emotional exploration, monologue study, scene study, and Shakespeare's sonnets. Furthermore, Acting II will allow students to express themselves creatively in a safe, supportive, and nurturing environment.
Prerequisite: THR* 110